What’s in your Bug-Out Bag?

by
posted on March 31, 2014
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There are unlimited sources for bug-out bag lists, but you should also consider your own unique circumstances and specific needs (don’t just purchase a generic kit and call it good). Everybody's kit will be different, but each should have the basics. You should be able to carry your own kit, as well as someone else’s, if they (kids, older people, pets) can’t. Mine weighs more than the recommended 25 percent of your body weight, but I've made sure I can lift, stand and hike with it if required.

The pack that I use has an extremely practical and cool feature, a smaller backpack that zips onto the larger pack. I've loaded what I consider to be the most critical items in the smaller pack, so I'm still ready if I only have room/energy for the smaller pack.

These items are not in order of importance. Wherever possible, and practical, I use resealable and/or space saver bags-both to protect stuff and to have the bags available.

Small (Critical Items) Pack:

Water filtration system, steel cup and collapsible water bottle

Food

Fire starter and candles

Disposable towels

Headlamp with spare batteries

Comprehensive first-aid kit (also includes trauma equipment, rubbing alcohol, saline, dental floss for sutures, etc.)

Duct tape, paracord, zip ties

Garbage bags

Whistle (I like the Storm brand)

Fixed-blade knife

Multitool

Permanent marker

Socks

Fleece stocking cap

Non-battery flashlight

Clothes (including waterproof stuff)

Saw

Neoprene work gloves

Nitrile gloves (also in first-aid kit)

Alcohol wipes (also in first-aid kit)

Orange safety vest

Orange surveyor's tape

Orange bandana

Survival suit

Space blanket

Strobing (clip on) blinker

Breathing mask (dust, etc.)

Copies of important documents and information

Medications

Cash (small and larger bills)

Personal defense tools go on my person

In the larger pack (which zips to the smaller)

Tent

Sleeping bag

Solar charging panel and adaptors

Extra clot

hing

Quick-dry microfiber towel

Permanent marker

Energy drinks

Large garbage bags (the dark, thick ones)

Waterproof pads-can be used together as tarp or individually to carry, wrap, funnel, etc.

Tissues

Toothbrush and toothpaste

Emergency poncho

Baby wipes

Additional first-aid supplies (to supplement those in small pack)

Extra shoes

Playing cards (aside from obvious use, can also be used for paper, etc.)

Peabody's pack-is sized specifically to go into her carrier, just in case we need that for transport, shelter, etc. The carrier has a shoulder strap, so I can have both hands free, even with all the kits on me. (It won’t be pretty, but….)

Food and treats

Stainless-steel food and water bowls

First-aid kit (I put together dog specific gear)

Extra copies of rabies and other vaccinations, vet contact info, etc.

Extra leash

Extra collars, including lighted collar

Extra harness

Extra ID tags (carrier, harnesses and collars also have ID attached)

Blinker light (can attach to leash, collar, harness, etc.)

Muzzle

Dog-waist disposal bags

Quick-dry micro fiber towel

Waterproof jacket; Thundershirt; booties

Rescue Remedy (herbal calming drops)

Toys

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