Historical Firearm Features

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Rifleman Q&A: Puzzled By S&W Revolver Markings

A gun's markings will reveal specialized information that is pertinent to its identification, manufacture and origin. Contributing Editor John F. Treakle chimes in to help identify one peculiar Smith & Wesson Model 10-7 revolver.

I Have This Old Gun: Dutch Luger

In this American Rifleman TV segment of "I Have This Old Gun," we take a look at the features and history of one of the German designed P08 Luger semi-automatic service pistol as used by the Dutch military.

New For 2021: Uberti USA Hardin Revolver

American Rifleman’s Mark Keefe met with Uberti USA’s Tom Leoni to check out the latest Smith & Wesson replica—the Hardin, a 2nd Model No. 3 top-break handgun chambered for .45 Colt.

Smith & Wesson's Model 39 'Hush Puppy': A Sidearm for the SEALs

Early SEAL teams utilized this not-so-well-known Smith & Wesson Model 39 "Hush Puppy" variant when stealth was a top priority.

Chinese Warlord Pistols: 1916-1949

What, you’ve never heard of a “Wauser?” During the Chinese Warlord era, pistols of every description were bought from major Western gunmakers—and then indigenous copies were made at a host of facilities in China. It’s not much of a stretch to say that no two are exactly alike.

I Have This Old Gun: Astra A300

In this American Rifleman TV segment of "I Have This Old Gun," we take a look at the features and history of the semi-automatic Astra A300 handgun.

The Colt New Service: A Look Back

More than a century after its debut, Colt’s big, bold and beautiful double-action revolver is still cherished.

New for 2021: Taylor's & Company ACE

Taylor's & Company developed its ACE pistol as a short-barreled, carry-ready model based on the iconic Model 1858 Remington revolver.

This Old Gun: Smith & Wesson Registered Magnum

Smith & Wesson's Registered Magnum was purpose-built to chamber the hot, new cartridge of the day: the .357 Magnum.

Valuable Service: The U.S. Model of 1917 Revolvers

Swept into World War I in April 1917, the U.S. military desperately needed .45 ACP handguns. Both Colt and Smith & Wesson had existing revolver designs adopted as the Model of 1917, and they would go on to serve again during World War II.

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