Springfield Armory Adds RO Elite Series to Range Officer Line

by
posted on July 17, 2017
ro_pi9136er_r.jpg

Springfield Armory has added four new RO Elite models to its 1911 Range Officer line, each offered in 9 mm and .45 ACP chamberings. The new pistols are clad in the same self-lubricating corrosion-resistant Black-T treatment as on Springfield Armory 1911s built for the FBI’s regional SWAT and Hostage Rescue Teams, and also include the newly designed Gen 2 triggers, ambidextrous thumb safeties, and custom thin-line G-10 grips. While these upgrades typically run $370, the pistols are reflecting only a $125 price jump.

“The original 1911 Range Officer line remains a huge success with serious shooters,” said Dennis Reese, Springfield Armory CEO. “It made professional level performance more affordable by leveraging the tools, techniques and experience only Springfield Armory has. That’s always been our calling card. The new RO Elite models are more of the same: premium features, high performance, affordable price.”

The RO Elite Target is engineered for accuracy, features a forged-steel match-grade frame and slide, 5” stainless steel, match-grade barrel, fully adjustable rear target sight, fiber optic front sight, and GI recoil system.

The RO Elite Operator features a 5” match-grade stainless-steel barrel, Picatinny rail, and slanted serrations on the front and rear of the slide. Additionally, it has a GI recoil system, a tactical ledge, white-dot rear sight and fiber optic front sight.

The RO Elite Champion features a 4” stainless-steel match-grade barrel captured in a forged steel slide with flat wire captive recoil system. The full-height, forged lightweight aluminum alloy frame is light and strong. This model is topped with a tactical ledge, white-dot rear sight and red fiber-optic front sight.

The RO Elite Compact carries a 4” stainless steel match-grade bull barrel with fully supported ramp and a flat wire captive recoil system. The compact frame is forged aluminum alloy, maximizing concealment and minimizing weight. A low-profile, tactical ledge, white-dot rear sight with fiber-optic front sight sits on a forged steel slide, allowing quick and accurate target acquisition.

“We’re proud to offer new choices for pistol shooters who appreciate details,” said Reese. “And especially proud to prove, once again, that you can own and enjoy a high-quality firearm without breaking the bank.”

For all the specifications, go to springfield-armory.com.

 

Latest

Developing Walther Pdp F Series 5
Developing Walther Pdp F Series 5

Developing The Walther Arms PDP F-Series

Walther Arms' PDP F-Series is a duty-grade handgun that's built specifically to fit the average woman's hand. Here's how the company developed this innovative offering and how its history in the Olympics informed its design process.

11 New Ammo Options For 2023

As the ammunition market is returning to normal, many manufacturers are seeing this as a cue to introduce new loads of America's favorite cartridges as well a few new cartridges altogether.

Ballistic Software—Hot & Trending In 2023

Gun owners are more connected today than ever before, and thanks to modern software and mobile hardware, today’s trendy shooter has the computing power to simply solve complex ballistic calculations with just a few swipes. Here are the trending ballistic apps of 2023.

The Armed Citizen® Jan. 27, 2023

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

NRA Gun Of The Week: Browning Citori Hunter Grade II

Follow American Rifleman staff on this “Gun Of The Week” with the Browning Firearms Citori Hunter Grade II, a field-ready, 16-gauge shotgun that sure doesn’t disappoint. In fact, this boxlock shotgun has everything you need and nothing that you don’t.

Rifleman Q&A: U.S. Model Of 1928 Thompson Variants

I was reading an auction catalog, and a reference was made to an American military Thompson submachine gun. It stated it was a “1928 Colt Navy overstamp, not a Savage.” The catalog made that verbiage seem important. What’s the significance of the “overstamp,” and were there other military 1928 Thompsons besides the Navy guns?

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.