Savage Partners with the Canadian University Shooting Foundation

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posted on September 7, 2021
Savage Partners With

Savage Arms has announced its sponsorship of the Canadian University Shooting Foundation (CUSF), a group dedicated to the development of competitive shooting sports between Canadian universities and colleges. The famed firearm manufacturer has signed a three-year partnership with the CUSF and will assist the organization with a supply of rifles and shotguns for competitors. 

“Savage is committed to supporting shooting sports, and it is honored to be able to partner with the CUSF,” said Beth Shimanski, Savage Arms marketing director. “Savage continues to lead the industry in innovative new firearms that help competitive shooters do what they do best. The Canadian University Shooting Foundation’s mission dovetails perfectly with that of Savage Arms, and we’re excited to introduce a new audience to the potential of Savage’s rimfire rifles and shotguns.”

“The Canadian University Shooting Federation is excited to be working with Savage Arms in a joint mission of firearms education and sport shooting skills development,” said David Fahlman, president of the CUSF. “Partnering with industry helps lower the barrier of entry and ensures a young, vibrant shooting community for years to come. Our student members are grateful for the generous support!”

CUSF is a non-profit organization founded in 2018 with a goal of promoting collegiate shooting sports across Canada. The CUSF sponsors matches, helps new teams get started, enables existing clubs to grow and prosper, and manages the Canadian University Trap and Skeet League. Four teams in the province of British Columbia participate in the league, as well as nine in Ontario, four in prairie regions of Canada and another in Nova Scotia.

Savage Arms has its headquarters and factory in Westfield, Mass., but it acquired Lakefield Arms in 1994. The factory, located in Ontario, Canada, specializes in the production of rimfire bolt-action rifles and earned a reputation for producing some of the best precision versions made today.

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