Rifleman Q & A: Needing A Hand With My Remington Rand

by
posted on August 16, 2017
rand.jpg

Q: I own a Remington Rand .45-cal. M1911A1 with a stamped serial number of 195XXXX. According to Wikipedia, “Remington Rand produced more M1911A1 pistols in World War II than any other wartime manufacturer,” yet I cannot seem to locate this pistol in either the Blue Book of Gun Values or Gun Digest. On the other hand, Guns International’s website says this model is a “Very rare documented World War II issue.” Can you square this away for me? This Remington is the typewriter manufacturer, not the arms company.

A: According to the serial number you provided, your pistol was made by Remington Rand in 1943 and consigned to the U.S. Army. Additional information can be found within Blue Book of Gun Values, Thirty-Seventh Edition on p. 543. Unless there is some special provenance to this particular pistol, “very rare” is a vast exaggeration, for the vintage is among the most commonly found. For an inexperienced seller, prices shown in books are usually a retail value and a dealer will pay 50-75 percent of the published price.

If you have a relationship with a licensed dealer whom you trust, they can be very helpful, but sometimes, especially if you have something known to be valuable, a professional appraisal might be a good idea. I use books as a ballpark guide. Condition is vital to value and is usually given as a percentage of the original finish.

—Charles E. Petty, Contributing Editor

Latest

Review Heritage Roscoe
Review Heritage Roscoe

Review: Heritage Mfg. Roscoe

Heritage Mfg. is known for its line of Old West-style firearms, but with its new Roscoe revolver, based on Taurus' Model 85, the brand steps into the world of old-school detective work.

New For 2024: Hi-Point Firearms YC380

Hi-Point Firearms is expanding its next-generation "YEET Cannon" line of firearms with YC380 chambered for .380 ACP.

Preview: Winchester Gun Cabinet 18

Steel cabinets like the Winchester Safes GC18 bridge the gap between old wooden gun cabinets that take only seconds for a motivated thief to break into and huge safes that require heavy equipment to move, while also being relatively economical.

The Armed Citizen® July 19, 2024

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

Gun Of The Week: Military Armament Corp. MAC 2 Tactical Wood

Watch American Rifleman editors on the range to learn about the MAC 2 Tactical Wood, a semi-automatic shotgun from Military Armament Corporation.

The Flintlock Pocket Pistol: Georgian England's Micro-Compact

The concept of concealed carry is not a modern phenomenon, as evidenced by these flintlock "turn-off" pocket pistols, which were hugely popular at the end of the 18th century.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.