Moving Targets

posted on September 25, 2013
rackley2015_fs.jpg (3)

Much of our shooting and training take place from static positions against motionless targets because adding movement at a range can be expensive and difficult.

Many ranges have no way to safely allow movement on the part of shooters. Other ranges just don’t want the hassle of setting up the specialized areas needed for moving targets or moving shooters considering the number of people that just want to put holes in targets. And, of course, many moving target systems are just too expensive for small, personal ranges.

All of this is preventing many of us from obtaining real-world experience against moving targets. And that is too bad since I seriously doubt that an attacker is going to stand straight and tall and allow someone the time to draw, aim and fire, and neither should you. The moment an attacker realizes his victim has a way to fight back, he’s going to start moving.

Over the years, I’ve had times when I could set up movement situations for shooters. Unfortunately, I’ve never been able to afford a moving target system, though I have shot against a few. I did, however, set up a way to practice on moving targets using an old tire.

Simply tape a piece of cardboard to the inside of a tire, and have a friend roll the tire into the shooting zone. Of course, this must be done safely, so pay careful attention to the course set up. Unless you have bulletproof barricades, the only safe way to conduct this drill is from an angle on the same line as the shooter. Simply roll the tire at an angle away from the shooter. A hill really helps both motion and speed.

Remember, a fight is not a duel, where two people take careful aim and are honor bound to stand. Because of this, you’ll need to know how to move during a fight, and how to hit a moving target. What tips can you provide for setting up affordable ways to train against moving targets?

Latest

Marlin firearms lever-action rifles left and right side quatering views
Marlin firearms lever-action rifles left and right side quatering views

Ruger Re-Energizing Marlin Enthusiasts

Honoring the legacy of a 152-year-old legendary gunmaker is no easy task, but Ruger’s remains squarely focused on that mission while it resurrects a brand that languished under Remington Outdoor management.

I Have This Old Gun: British Snider Enfield

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2020 to learn about the British Snider Enfield.

Blast From The Past: Revisiting The 9 mm Magnum 'Super Cooper'

Follow Brad Miller as he takes a closer look at the 9 mm "Super Cooper" magnum handgun cartridge, which can have cases made for it from cut down .223 Rem. casings.

Smith & Wesson Model 10: A Legendary K-Frame Available Today

Today’s Model 10 chambers .38 Spl. and can handle +P loads. Cylinder capacity is six cartridges in the single/double action. Its frame, cylinder and barrel are carbon steel, blued in classic fashion and the grips are wood. It’s a timeless look.

Tips & Techniques: A Penny For Your Dry-Fire Thoughts

When performing dry-fire practice with an AR-15, there are a lot of reasons you might not want the bolt to lock to the rear. You can use dummy rounds, snap caps or other safety aids, but there’s another trick used in training circles requiring far less investment.

NRA Foundation Grants $252,000 For Ammo To USA Shooting

The NRA Foundation Board of Trustees has approved a $252,000 grant for USA Shooting to purchase the specific shotshells used by the National Team, National Development Team and National Junior Team.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.