Lack of Curiosity or Concern

posted on December 17, 2013
rackley2015_fs.jpg (1)

The other night, three fire engines roared into my neighborhood a little after 10 p.m. Realizing that a problem was potentially at hand, I threw on some clothes and tramped out into the cold to learn whether or not this problem could affect my home and family.

Standing there, I watched firefighters in full gear dive off of their trucks to access the situation, all the while preparing to risk their lives for others. As I stood there, though, I realized that I was the only resident that had departed from indoor warmth out of curiosity or concern.

Since Northern Virginia, like many other urban areas, is covered by townhomes and condos, where problems in one unit can easily affect others, I was quite surprised. Sure, people can look out the window to view the lights, but don’t they want to know what unit could be on fire? The activity reminded me of the last time that the fire department was called out to my area, where only a few of the close to 100 residents exited to discover what was happening.

All this made me wonder whether it was a lack of curiosity or concern that kept people indoors when bright, red, flashing lights streamed through windows and sirens screamed into the darkness. Do people just assume that nothing can happen to them? Or are they just hoping for the best, and not preparing for the worst?

It seems to me that these are the people who stroll down the nation’s sidewalks, while checking email and not paying any attention to anything. They are probably also the people who have the greatest chance of being robbed or attacked. Don’t be one of these people. Curiosity makes you want to see the people around you in all situations, and concern helps you avoid danger.

I really just want to know that I’m not the only person out there who actually wants to know what’s happening in the neighborhood, especially if it can affect me and mine. Do you agree?

Latest

Revisiting 9Mm Super Cooper F
Revisiting 9Mm Super Cooper F

Blast From The Past: Revisiting The 9 mm Magnum 'Super Cooper'

Follow Brad Miller as he takes a closer look at the 9 mm "Super Cooper" magnum handgun cartridge, which can have cases made for it from cut down .223 Rem. casings.

Smith & Wesson Model 10: A Legendary K-Frame Available Today

Today’s Model 10 chambers .38 Spl. and can handle +P loads. Cylinder capacity is six cartridges in the single/double action. Its frame, cylinder and barrel are carbon steel, blued in classic fashion and the grips are wood. It’s a timeless look.

Tips & Techniques: A Penny For Your Dry-Fire Thoughts

When performing dry-fire practice with an AR-15, there are a lot of reasons you might not want the bolt to lock to the rear. You can use dummy rounds, snap caps or other safety aids, but there’s another trick used in training circles requiring far less investment.

NRA Foundation Grants $252,000 For Ammo To USA Shooting

The NRA Foundation Board of Trustees has approved a $252,000 grant for USA Shooting to purchase the specific shotshells used by the National Team, National Development Team and National Junior Team.

This Old Gun: Winchester Model 1892 'Trapper'

The Winchester 1873 may have been “The Gun That Won The West,” but it was the Winchester Model 1892, with its smoother, stronger action, that soon began outselling the earlier toggle-link lever-action and eventually caused the ‘73’s demise in 1921.

Preview: Wilson Combat WCP365 Grip Module

Wilson Combat is offering aftermarket grip modules compatible with SIG Sauer’s P365/P365 XL micro-compact semi-automatic pistols that significantly improve the host handguns’ ergonomics while adding a touch of custom flair.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.