It’s Not a Game

posted on November 18, 2013
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I’m actually sad having to write this blog, as this entire subject seems to show a departure from human decency. If you haven’t heard of the Knockout Game, also called One-Hitter Quitter, then you need to pay attention, and not just to this writer.

It seems as if small groups of America’s youth, primarily in large urban areas, have decided that its funny to try and “knock out” random people on the street with a single blow. If you don’t believe me, type it into a search engine or video-sharing site, but be prepared to be disgusted on a level that I can’t even describe. There are numerous videos of people from all manners of life being attacked, usually from behind or the side, while simply walking down the street, even in daylight hours.

The attacks come with no warning and are completely random, and in at least one instance, resulted in death. In New Jersey, there is video of one Ralph Santiago being followed by some teenagers into an alley when one of them strikes him in the head. He’s later found with his head lodged between some fence posts with a broken neck.

I’ve been watching posted videos of these attacks to determine what similarities can be learned, and I have noticed a few things. First, all of the attacks have happened in large, metropolitan areas. Second, the attacks typically originate from a single individual from within a group. Third, it’s almost always against a person walking alone in a semi-deserted area. And finally, it’s usually from behind.

So how do we prevent ourselves from becoming victims of these “yellow-bellied curs,” as my grandfather would have called them? In general, be aware. Know who is around you, and if someone seems suspicious, particularly a teenager, watch him and be prepared to defend yourself.

Specifically, stay out of urban areas if possible to start. Activities such as these usually run their course in a few months, after police make some arrests. If you must go into these areas, then you should travel in groups as much as possible and pay particular attention to teenagers in bunches. In no circumstances should you allow a group of teenagers to get behind you in close proximity, nor should you pass between some. If you must, walk across the street.

If you do pass some youths walking the opposite direction, watch them and turn to keep an eye on them until they are at least 20 to 30 feet away, preferable more. At that distance, you should have time to hear running footsteps and be able to turn toward the attack. If a group does manage to get behind you, walk into a store to allow them to go on, or even put your back against the wall and just watch them pass. While that might not seem nice or polite, this is not a game, and I don’t see any other way to defend against something this despicable. Avoidance is best, defense if you must. Let’s hope this trend ends quickly.

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