Video—The Men and Guns of the Vietnam War, Part 1

posted on September 20, 2017
The war fought by young Americans in Vietnam was this nation’s longest conflict until the Global War on Terror, and the firearm that became the great icon of the American experience in Vietnam is the U.S. M16 rifle. But where did the M16 come from and how did it perform on the battlefield? How did it go from a rifle that failed and resulted in the deaths of desperate young Americans found on the battlefield with their guns hopelessly jammed, to the nation’s longest serving infantry rifle? In this first installment of “The Men & Guns of the Vietnam War,” American Rifleman Television examines the evolution of the gun that we know as the M16 and its use in Vietnam. From the early AR-15s, then to the XM16E1, the M16 and its combat use are described in detail. We also hear from two familiar contributors to American Rifleman, the first being Field Editor Wiley Clapp, who served for a year and half in Vietnam, including as a company commander in the 3rd Btn., 7th Marines. Another version of the M16 used in the conflict was the XM77E2, better known as the CAR-15. Another contributor to American Rifleman, Major John L Plaster, used this gun behind enemy lines as part of the covert Studies and Observation Group. Back then, John Plaster was a U.S. Army Special Forces sergeant and team leader, and he describes the combat use of the CAR-15 against our nation’s enemies. Watch Part 1 of the series here.

Additional Viewing:
The Men and Guns of the Vietnam War, Part 2
The Men and Guns of the Vietnam War, Part 3

Latest

Qamain
Qamain

Rifleman Q&A: Bullet & Primer Sealant

From the archives of American Rifleman, one NRA member questions the importance of the colorful or black-colored paint-like coating around the cartridge necks and primer pockets of surplus ammunition.

Preview: Zero Tolerance Knives 0357BW

The U.S.-made Zero Tolerance 0357 Black Wash liner lock features a 3.25" blade of hard, wear-resistant CPM 20CV steel treated with a scratch-hiding blackwash finish best suited for everyday carry.

The French FR F2 Sniper Rifle

Conceived during the Cold War and after thirty years of service, the French are beginning to phase out the FR F2 bolt-action sniper rifle, with the surplus rifles available for sale from Navy Arms.

SIG Sauer P210: The Long-Lived Swiss Service Pistol

First designed in 1947, and formerly the official sidearm of the Swiss Army, the SIG Sauer P210 is still in production today, with a few modern upgrades.

The Winchester Model 94: History & Disassembly

Compact, reliable and powerful, Winchester's Model 1894 lever-actions may not have the popularity it once had with Western settlers, prospectors, law enforcement officers, hunters and ranchers, but its legacy remains today and is a fan favorite in Winchester's current product line.

NRA Gun of the Week: Fabarm USA Autumn

On this week’s “Gun of the Week” video preview, American Rifleman examines a first from Fabarm, a side-by-side break-action shotgun called the Autumn.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.