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Video—The Men and Guns of The Vietnam War, Part 2

In Part 2 of "The Men and Guns of Vietnam,” American Rifleman Television examines the guns used “in country” by Americans earlier in the conflict, as well as the forgotten guns. Early in the war in Vietnam, the standard infantry rifle was the “U.S. Rifle, 7.62 mm, M14,” John Garand’s last legacy, rendered in steel and walnut, and the M14 served well until replaced by the U.S. M16. American Rifleman Field Editor—then-Marine Capt.—Wiley Clapp thinks we should never have switched.

For American soldiers, Marines and sailors in Vietnam, the issued machine gun was the U.S. M60, called "the pig" by the young Americans who carried it, and we show the gun and discuss it’s effectiveness with two combat veterans who carried it. 

There were other guns used in the conflict, guns many don't think about right away when they think of Vietnam, including the guns that fought World War II in the hands of our Vietnamese allies. They include the Thompson SMG, the M1918A2 BAR and the Browning M1919 machine gun. There were other guns used by Special Forces soldiers, men like then Sgt. John L Plaster, including the Carl Gustav or Swedish K submachine gun—arguably the best such gun of its era. The U.S. military also made extensive use of combat shotguns, ranging from familiar Winchester Model 12 and 97s, as well as guns from Stevens and even Remington. Watch the entire Part 2 episode here.

Additional Viewing
The Men and Guns of the Vietnam War, Part 1

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