NRA Gun of the Week: Alexander Arms .50 Beowulf Hunter

What Alexander Arms set out to achieve with the development of its .50 Beowulf round ended with a cartridge that mimics the ballistic performance of the .45-70 Gov’t cartridge and is designed to be fired from a short-action, AR-15-style rifle. Suited for big-game hunting, as well as military and law-enforcement applications, the Alexander Arms .50 Beowulf cartridge utilizes a large-diameter .500” bullet propelled at a moderate velocity.

Combining this cartridge design with the company's dedicated .50 Beowulf AR-15-style Hunter rifle, sportsmen may appreciate its use for the myriad hunting opportunities North America has to offer, whether it's hunting black bear of the northeast, feral pigs of the south, whitetail deer of the heartland, elk and mule deer of the Rocky-Mountain states, Coues deer of the west and every other big-game animal in between.

Looking at the Alexander Arms .50 Beowulf Hunter rifle, you’ll discover initially the gun’s Prym1 woodland-camouflage finish covers much of the exterior. Internally, the company’s aluminum receiver features adjustments to accommodate the increased case size of the chambered cartridge. A Velocity single-stage trigger with a factory-set 3-lb. pull weight was included in this model.

Controls are a standard AR-15 configuration, and the gun’s grip is provided by Adaptive Tactical. Attached to the front of the receiver you’ll find a carbon-fiber TacStar handguard withMagpul M-lok attachment points, allowing for the use of a range of accessories. Within the handguard is a 16.5” button-rifled, chrome-moly steel barrel, which comes threaded for muzzle devices. At the reverse end, Alexander Arms leaned on Adaptive Tactical again for its adjustable stock.

To learn more about the Alexander Arms .50 Beowulf Hunter, check out our NRA Gun of the Week video above hosted by American Rifleman’s Christopher Olsen.

Specifications
Manufacturer: Alexander Arms
Model: .50 Beowulf Hunter
Chambering: .50 Beowulf
Action Type: gas-operated semi-automatic center-fire rifle
Receivers: aluminum
Barrel: 16.5” chrome-moly steel
Magazine: seven-round detachable box
Sights: none; Picatinny rail
Trigger: single-stage 3-lb. pull
Stock: adjustable
Finish: Prym1 Woodlands camouflage
MSRP: $1,795

Additional Reading:
A First Look at 2020's New Guns - by American Rifleman Staff
Modern Big-Game Bullets - by Craig Boddington
Big-Bore AR Cartridges - by Bryce Towsley
Handloads: 6.5 mm Grendel - by John Haviland
Review: Alexander Arms Ulfberht Rifle - by American Rifleman Staff












Extras:

NRA Gun of the Week: Alexander Arms Incursion Rifle


NRA Gun of the Week: AR-15 Rifle


I Have This Old Gun: Beretta AR 70 Rifle


I Have This Old Gun - Argentine Mausers


The Unstoppable AR-7 Survival Rifle


NRA Gun of the Week: U.S. Springfield Armory M1 Garand Rifle

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