Henry Repeating Arms Co. Expands Line and Capacity

by
posted on January 3, 2014
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This is shaping up to be a big year for Henry Repeating Arms. Probably the most exciting bit of news is the introduction of the Original Henry Rifle, which will be true to the design of the vaunted 1860 Henry rifle, though chambered for the more modern .44-40 Win. cartridge.

These guns will represent the first American production of the Henry rifle in 150 years. In addition to the Original Henry, various special-edition and engraved versions of Henry’s popular firearms will be introduced this year.

In order to keep up with demand and support a larger catalog of firearms, Henry will be relying heavily on its Rice Lake, Wis., facility. Previously used to support the company’s headquarters and flagship manufacturing plant in Bayonne, N.J., the Rice Lake operation will continue to make components, but will also move into the complete production of rifles, particularly the company’s steel-constructed center-fire offerings.

The expansion is made possible by Henry’s investment in modern machinery and skilled American personnel, and supports the company’s motto that Henry rifles will be “Made in America, or not made at all.”

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