Gold Cup Triggers

by
posted on December 11, 2013
wiley-clapp.jpg

A while back, I talked about trigger shoes, target triggers and the inadvisability of using either on guns that will be handled fast under stressful circumstances. I mentioned building up a combat 1911 on a Gold Cup receiver, then being disappointed with the results. For readers who may not know it, the Gold Cup pistol from Colt has an unusual trigger. It’s the familiar “long” length and it is much wider than the usual triggers. Wide enough to require a specially broached trigger slot in the receiver, this unit also installed a little lever to help protect the sear/hammer relationship. Colt did this in order to give the bullseye shooter a perfect trigger feel to match a light trigger pull weight. Gold Cups saw a lot of use back in the Golden Age of bullseye shooting.

A reader took exception to my criticism of the Gold Cup trigger system when used on a combat handgun. I believe the increased frontal surface has no place on a gun that will be used in life-threatening encounters. The edge of the Gold Cup trigger is very close to the protection of the trigger guard and it’s easily brushed off when performing some maneuvers. It is always best to stay with a single “feel” for any trigger. This has nothing to do with trigger pull weight. Jeff Cooper’s combat triggers weighed about 3 ½ pounds, which is very light. They were the original thinner type. For its intended use, the Gold Cup pistol and special wide trigger is excellent. That use is on a formal shooting bench and bullseye range, where the gun is carefully picked up, fitted into the hand and fired five times at a round bull, 25 or 50 yards away.

Latest

Foster 223Homedefense 6
Foster 223Homedefense 6

The AR-15 For Home Defense: 3 Loads To Consider

While many .223 Rem. and 5.56 NATO loads exist on the market, not all are best suited for home-defense use. Here are a few loads that are worth looking at.

Number Of New CCW Permits Still Growing

The number of people submitting to additional background checks, investing the time to meet requirements—which vary by state—and pay for a CCW permit has grown again in 2022.

NRA Gun Of The Week: Springfield Armory XD-M Elite 4.5” OSP In 10 mm Auto

Watch American Rifleman staff on the range to learn about the 10 mm Auto-chambered XD-M Elite 4.5” OSP, one of the latest offerings in Springfield Armory's feature-rich lineup of Croatian-made pistols.

The Armed Citizen® Dec. 2, 2022

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

Rifleman Q&A: M1903 vs. M1903A1 Rifles

I’ve seen references to an M1903A1 rifle. I’ve looked around at a bunch of gun shows, and I have not found a rifle marked “M1903A1.” How does that variant differ from a standard M1903 rifle?

PrairieFire Emerges Following Front Sight Chapter 11 Filing

PrairieFire announced this week that the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Nevada confirmed the Chapter 11 plan of reorganization under which it will acquire 100 percent of Front Sight Management’s equity.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.