Editors’ Picks 2017: Browning B15 Shotgun

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posted on March 13, 2017
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Browning is the company that put over-unders on the map with the Superposed or B25, which you can still order some 90 years into its production. But the B25 is a pricey, hand-built gun that has a pretty tall receiver. Part of the John M. Browning Collection, the new B15 is based on the 725 over-under action made by Miroku, but it is assembled, stocked and engraved by artisans in Herstal, Belgium, at the Browning Custom Shop. The engraving is full-coverage and hand-cut. The gun has the low-profile receiver height of the 725, but sideplates have been added to the boxlock to provide more room for ornamentation. Triggers are mechanical, and the wood is beautiful. There are four grades offered, all in 12 gauge. We’ll warn you, although less than a B25, the B15 is still spendy. browning.com

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