Browning Continues Citori 725 High Grade Program

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posted on April 24, 2017
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Browning's High Grade Program moves into its fifth year with a limited production of Citori 725 Grade V and Grade VII Trap models. These exquisitely enhanced over-under shotguns receive as much as 30 hours of hand engraving and touch-up work prior to being precisely fit into finely crafted, high-grade walnut. 

The Citori 725 Grade VII Trap 12-gauge shotgun has a blued receiver with deep-relief engraving and gold accents. The stock and forearm feature oil finish Grade VI/VII walnut with close radius pistol grip and palm swell. A John M. Browning Signature fitted case is included. MSRP: $6,399.99 

The Citori 725 Grade V Trap 12-gauge receiver features deep relief engraving and a silver nitride finish. The stock and forearm are Grade V/VI walnut. A canvas/distressed leather fitted case is included. MSRP: $5,339.99

Features on both models:
-Steel low profile receiver
-30" or 32" barrels
-Barrels with ventilated top and side ribs, ported with high post top rib
-Fire Lite Mechanical Trigger System
-Hammer ejectors
-Top-Tang safety
-Monte Carlo cheekpiece
-Semi-Beavertail forearm with finger grooves
-Vector Pro lengthened forcing cones
-Five extended Invector-DS choke tubes
-Triple Trigger System
-Hiviz Pro-Comp fiber-optic sight and ivory bead

For more information visit browning.com

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