Accelerating Short-Cased Magnums

by
posted on May 12, 2009
2009518113116-cutmag2feature.jpg

Mr. Ling, a true fan of American Rifleman who is proud that he has not missed an issue in nearly 60 years, recently informed me he does not care for articles about new cartridges. "You're just splitting hairs going on and on about some whiz-bang that's five or 10 f.p.s. faster than the last one," he chided. "Listen, you make a good shot, and none of them are any better than what we already have. Who needs them?"

Mr. Hornady is equally attentive when the new Rifleman arrives at his desk, but you can bet he takes a different view of new-cartridge articles. The company that bears the family name and was founded by Steve's father, the late Joyce Hornady, seems determined to keep our attention focused on new developments in ammunition.

Over the past decade, Hornady has introduced an amazing array of new rounds. There are little, fun ones like .17 HMR and .204 Ruger; big brutes like .376 Steyr and .375 Ruger; efficient deer-stoppers like .30 T/C and .308 Marlin Express; and highly specialized numbers like .480 Ruger and 6.5 Creedmoor. Hornady's latest whiz-bangs, the .300 and .338 Ruger Compact Magnums, may well be the most mainstream of the lot because they are targeted at a huge user group-North American big-game hunters.

So let the hair splitting begin.

The hairs in this case were covering the shoulder of a 6x6 bull elk that had just turned for one last look in our direction. For several minutes it had been walking straight away, effectively denying me a shot, and very shortly it would follow the rest of its herd over the horizon. "Five-twelve," ranged outfitter John Porter, no longer bothering to whisper. "You know where to hold." Thanks to an insightful pre-hunt range session with Porter and Steve Hornady, I knew precisely what to expect from my pre-production, custom- barreled .338 RCM. Rested on my pack, the rifle was as steady as could be, and from the prone position I was as steady as I can be. Accordingly, the 225-gr. Hornady SP bullet did indeed split those shoulder hairs and abruptly slammed the bull to the turf.

Mr. Ling's contention, that if we "make a good shot" with whatever rifle/cartridge we're using, the result will be a hit, I can't argue with; but I will offer my observations on the RCM cartridges as a way of pointing out how our equipment can play a pivotal role in helping us to make that good shot....

Latest

Horman Ar10takedown 3
Horman Ar10takedown 3

Building A Takedown Pistol In .308 Win.

With the large amount of components available for the AR-10 platform, along with a new trend of more compact AR pistols, constructing your own foldable, compact, takedown AR-10 pistol is possible.

Kahr Arms To Host Annual Rod of Iron Freedom Fest

Kahr Firearms Group is hosting this year’s “Rod of Iron Freedom Festival” at its Greeley, Penn., Kahr Headquarters facility.

Mossberg Maverick 88: Mossberg's Budget-Priced Pump Shotgun

The Maverick 88 is one of Mossberg's best known shotgun models and is currently available in 14 different versions.

The Men And Guns Of D-Day: 82nd Airborne Division

Watch this segment of American Rifleman Television "The Men And Guns Of D-Day" to learn more about the men of the 82nd Airborne Division, their stories and the firearms they used during "The Great Crusade."

MidwayUSA Grants $2.3 Million To Help Youth Shooting Teams

The MidwayUSA Foundation recently announced the payout of more than $2.23 million in cash grants to 612 youth shooting teams.

Review: Bond Arms Roughneck

The Roughneck derringer from Bond Arms is an entry-level option in 9 mm Luger, but don’t let that fool you, as the quality of its materials and craftsmanship rival those of the company’s top-end variants.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.