Perishable Skills

posted on May 22, 2013
rackley2015_fs.jpg (3)

Many don’t realize it, but shooting is a perishable skill that must be continuously renewed through practice and training. Every expert recommends regular range time to both improve and maintain accuracy and the skills needed to ward off a deadly attack. This is constantly proven by the thousands of rounds fired every year by competitors to stay at the top of their fields.

While most of us can’t afford the money or time to fire that number of rounds, regular range time is needed to ensure that muscle memory stays at current levels, and even more to improve on those skills. In addition, it is important to learn your carry gun, as firearms, while similar in many regards, are not all the same with controls located in different locations and working in different ways; a 1911 safety lever is disengaged by pressing it down while the safety on a Beretta 92 must be moved up before firing.

Even if time is an issue, or lack of ammunition, dry fire practice, with or without a training laser, is better than nothing and can be done almost anywhere. On a regular basis, I unload my Kimber, stand in front of a mirror and practice drawing and firing. Also, whenever I swap guns or carry methods, whether for testing purposes or because I just want to carry something different, I spend a few minutes locking the muscle memory in my mind for that day. I don’t ever want to reach for my gun because of a situation to discover that it is somewhere else, which could cause me to lose precious seconds, and change the desired outcome.

Life is busy. With two youngsters clamoring for my time, I’m well aware that heading to the range for training is sometimes difficult. However, since part of my job as a father, husband and honest citizen is ensuring that my skills are up to the task, I make time for both dry- and live-fire practice. You should too.

Latest

The Armed Citizen
The Armed Citizen

The Armed Citizen® May 23, 2022

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

2022 Rifle Of The Year: Ruger 10/22 Competition Rifle Left-Handed Model

Now in their 20th year, the Golden Bullseye Awards are chosen annually to recognize the firearm industry’s best new offerings. Here is this year’s winners as selected by the editors of “The World’s Oldest And Largest Firearm Authority.”

America’s Prototype 'Trench Guns' Of World War I

Arms of all sorts were in high demand at the onset of the Great War, including a new type of close-quarters combat firearm: the repeating shotgun. Though several designs were explored, only a few made it into the trenches before the Armistice was signed.

Preview: Hogue Knives Deka Manual Folder

Hogue, Inc. expanded its lineup of American-made knives with the Deka Manual Folder.

Reasons To Consider Sub-Gauge Shotguns

Shooting as often as you like with a shotgun sounds like fun, but high-volume shooting takes planning and preparation—and the right sub-gauge gun.

Preview: Apex Tactical Springfield Hellcat Threaded Barrel

Machined from cold-hammer-forged, stainless-steel blanks, the Apex Tactical Hellcat Threaded Barrel is a drop-in replacement for any Springfield Armory Hellcat.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.