Glock G26: One of 2019's Hottest Handguns

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posted on March 9, 2020
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For the second year in a row, the Glock G26 has claimed runner-up honors in the list of hottest-selling semi-auto pistols on Gunbroker.com. Like the top-place-finishing SIG Sauer P365 Nitron Micro-Compact, it’s also a sub-compact designed for every day carry or backup duty.

Glock introduced its original G26 to American enthusiasts in 1996, but the Gen5 improvements added to select models in August of 2017 breathed new life into a number of its veteran variants. When they arrived on this time-proven 9 mm, sales soared with refinements that include a tougher, more durable Glock nDLC finish on the slide and barrel.

The latter was also upgraded to the company’s “Marksman” version with improved rifling, enhanced accuracy and refined crown. The ambidextrous slide stop lever adds appeal to southpaws and the subtly flared mag well speeds reloads. Perhaps more importantly, depending on opinion, finger grooves are gone from the grip.

The Glock reputation for quality and reliability didn’t change, though. The striker-fired semi-auto weighs in at 21.69 ozs. with an empty magazine and has a 3.43" barrel. Three standard magazines come with the pistol and have a capacity of 10 cartridges. The company also offers 12-, 15-, 17-, 19-, 24-, 31- and 33-round versions. The forged-steel slide measures 6.26" and the frame is polymer. The steel barrel has a 1:9.84", right-hand rate of twist.

The double-action-only pistol is 6.42" long, 1.3"wide and 4.17" in height with the standard magazine. The slide’s front serrations ensure manipulation in inclement weather. Sights are fixed with white-lined U-notch to the rear and a bright white dot on the front post. Amerigo BOLD Night Sights or Glock Night Sights are included on select models for faster target acquisition and alignment in challenging light conditions. MSRP for the G26 Gen5 base version is $599.

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