Steyr Arms Introduces Scout RFR Rifle

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posted on April 28, 2017
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The Steyr Scout RFR, a fast, straight-pull rifle that emulates the look and feel of the original Steyr Scout Rifle on a rimfire platform, will make its official debut at the 2017 NRA Annual Meetings and Exhibits in Atlanta.

Based on the proven, biathlon-inspired SPA action built by fellow Austrian firearms manufacturer ISSC, the Steyr Scout RFR was designed from the ground up as an economical, minimal-recoil Scout Rifle trainer. Available in .22 LR, .22 WMR, and .17 HMR, the Scout RFR has an exceptionally smooth straight-pull action fed from its 10-round magazine, allowing for extremely fast cycling that makes training easy and range time enjoyable.

Code-named "Cub Scout" during its development, the Scout RFR features the same stock lines as the original Steyr Scout, as designed by Steyr engineers with the continual input of scout-rifle-concept visionary, Col. Jeff Cooper. The Scout RFR provides a 30-slot Picatinny rail along its barrel for forward-mounted optics. An integrated 3/8" dovetail base also runs the full length of the receiver's topside, and a set of Weaver bases are also included for conventional scope mounting. 

The Scout RFR also features a 20" heavy-barrel configuration for maximum accuracy. Both the .17 HMR and .22 LR barrels are 1/2-20 UNF threaded for the users' choice of attachments, while the .22 WMR barrel is not. The overall length of the Scout RFR is 35.6", and its base weight is 7.3 lbs. An optional knife tucks away neatly into the stock, and the standard Steyr SBS/Scout buttplate spacers can be swapped in or out to adjust length-of-pull.

The Steyr Scout RFR includes two Weaver bases, one 10-round steel-box magazine and an owner's manual.

MSRP: $599

For more information visit steyrarms.com

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