LaserLyte Score Tyme Target And Trigger Tyme Trainers

by
posted on May 19, 2015
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The only way to become a better handgun shooter is to pull more triggers. But ammunition doesn’t grow on trees, and few of us have a range at home. Dry-fire practice is an alternative, but it’s about as much fun as peeling potatoes for someone else’s stew. Dry firing also lacks a very important aspect of practice—feedback. Laser-assisted practice is an option, and LaserLyte has some unique and affordable training products.

LaserLyte manufactures a variety of defensive handgun laser sights, but might be best known for its laser training devices. Two of the newest are the Trigger Tyme laser gun and Score Tyme laser target. Both can be used almost anywhere, together or independently. They can improve your shooting, and they’re fun.

In an earlier test of how practical and effective laser training could be, three evaluators fired several groups for record with real ammunition. Then, every day for seven days, they worked with LaserLyte’s older Laser Target. At the end of the week, another live-fire session was conducted. On average, groups shrank by about 30 percent—proof positive that the concept works.

The Score Tyme target is an updated version of LaserLyte’s Laser Target. It’s an 8.5"x13" polymer box containing clever circuitry and three AA batteries. On the face of the Score Tyme target is a 7" bullseye target and two, 2" control targets. In the center there’s a digital timer and score window. The laser sensing targets are compatible with any LaserLyte laser.

While innovative minds will likely come up with more, there are basically two ways to train with the Score Tyme target. You can shoot at the target at your leisure, and it will record the laser impacts. When you’re done, shoot the “Start/Display” control target and your hits will appear, illuminated by the 147 individual LEDs within the target area, and the total score for the string is calculated and shown in the three-digit score/timer window. Alternatively, you can shoot the “Set Time/Reset” target and choose between a five-, 10- or 15-second time frame during which you can shoot the target. The target will count down to zero as you start shooting, registering as many hits as you can make before time expires. When time runs out your score is displayed.

During initial testing, the Score Tyme target seemed to be stuck in the timed mode. We contacted LaserLyte and were instructed to move the target into an area with less light. We did, and it worked perfectly. No other issues were encountered with the target or pistols during several hours of testing.
The obvious question is: What should you shoot LaserLyte’s new Score Tyme target with? When I experimented with the older version, we used LaserLyte’s Universal Pistol Trainer—a laser device that inserts in a pistol’s barrel and flashes a laser every time the pistol’s trigger is pulled. To test the newer Score Tyme target, I used LaserLyte’s new Trigger Tyme training pistols with integral lasers.

These blue, Glock-style polymer pistols have functioning triggers that feel similar to the trigger on a striker-fired handgun. Dimensionally, one replicates a full-size pistol, the other a compact. They have square-notch rear and post front sights, and every time you pull the trigger you get a laser flash.

The pistols run on three A76 batteries that have a 50,000-shot approximate life span. The trainers also come with a hex wrench that allows you to adjust the laser impact to point of aim at the exact distance you wish to train.

When it comes to pistol training, there is no substitute for pulling a trigger. LaserLyte’s trainers offer a means for high-volume practice shooting that is easy-to-use and completely safe, anywhere. Firearm instructors teaching basic handgun shooting should really consider adding these to their toolboxes, as should a lot of shooters. Price: $349. Contact: LaserLyte, 30 N. Alamos Drive, Cottonwood, AZ 86326; (928) 649-3201; laserlyte.com.

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