LaserLyte TLB-1 Laser Trainer Target

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posted on January 3, 2012
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Accomplished shooters understand that trigger control is fundamental to good marksmanship. The ability to press the trigger completely through a clean break without disturbing the sight picture is essential to producing consistent hits on a target. That’s why dry-fire practice is so valuable and why the LaserLyte TLB-1 Laser Trainer Target is worth its weight in gold—or an equivalent quantity of ammunition.

The TLB-1 can be engaged from up to 50 yds. with LaserLyte’s Laser Trainer cartridges, available in 9 mm Luger, .40 S&W and .45 ACP, and with its bore-mounted, sound-activated LT-PRO and LT-1 Laser Trainers—the former’s nearly flush-fitting design allowing drawing from holsters and the latter’s adapters allowing it to fit in and boresight handguns and rifles. The TLB-1’s secret is 62 laser-activated LEDs, which individually register a latent “hit” when struck by an incoming beam.

Firing the laser at a smaller, separate Display area at the lower left of the unit’s 6¼"x9½" housing visibly reveals a static display of the entire shot string. Firing on the Reset area at the unit’s lower right clears the group and readies the TLB-1 for another session or shooter.

A manually operated power switch activates the TLB-1, which is powered by three AA batteries. The TLB-1 not only offers the promise of hours of economical trigger time and a corresponding increase in shooting skill, it is also just plain fun to use.

Suggested Retail Price: $219.95.

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