Fear & Loading: Magpul Headlines are Deceiving

by
posted on April 12, 2017
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Gun and accessory sales have slowed from their record surge, and when Magpul Industries announced last week it no longer needs the services of the 85 temporary workers to meet the increased demand, some labeled it a “layoff.” The term doesn’t accurately reflect the situation or the company’s financial health.  

When Magpul opened its manufacturing and distribution center in Cheyenne, Wyo., early in 2015, the company anticipated only employing 95 there by this year. One hundred and sixty-three people remain hard at work in the plant—a figure that exceeds its staffing forecast by 72 percent.

As NICS checks hit a record-setting pace, though, Magpul—in a move similar to malls hiring additional holiday help—employed a service that specializes in providing seasonal, temporary and full-time personnel. Now that the supply lines are filled and the surge in demand is back to a new normal, 85 workers from that company are no longer needed. Wyoming Business Council spokesman Ron Gullberg put the move in perspective. “There are going to be years when there are big production demands and then normal years,” he said.

Despite that fact, the announcement continues to stir conjecture. Magpul company spokesman Jon Anderson told reporters company growth is in line with projections. He added some firearm and gun-gear firms are finding it a challenge to adapt to current market conditions, but “… that is not the camp Magpul is in.”

Those impacted by the move will receive two months of full pay and benefits—a generous package, considering the plant only opened in 2015 and they couldn’t have worked there more than 28 months. The employment service is also hard at work to place each of them with a different firm.

Magpul left its Colorado facility in late 2014 due to gun-control legislation in the state, moving its headquarters to Texas and distribution and manufacturing to Wyoming.  

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