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Rifleman Review: Ruger SR1911 10 mm Auto

Sturm, Ruger and Co. is now producing its line of 1911 style handguns, the SR1911, in 10 mm Auto. the SR1911 is a recoil-operated semi-automatic 1911-style handgun that uses stainless-steel in the construction of both the slide and frame for this specific model. Like the other SR1911s, the 10 mm Auto version features an integral plunger tube machine into the frame instead of it being a separate piece. It also uses the same spring sets as the normal SR1911s chambered for .45 ACP, despite the difference in caliber.

The Ruger SR1911 chambered in 10 mm Auto.
The Ruger SR1911 chambered in 10 mm Auto.

Unlike other modern 1911 designs on the market, the SR1911 lacks a barrel bushing at the front of the slide. It instead uses a full-length recoil-spring guide rod and a cone-shaped barrel to create lockup at the front. the Barrel is 5" long with a 1:16" right-hand twist and ramped on the inside to improve feeding. The extractor is on the right side of the bolt face and the ejector is fixed to the frame.

A view of the controls on the left side of the SR1911
A view of the controls on the left side of the SR1911

The SR1911 comes with Bomar-style sights with grooves on the rear face to reduce glare. The rear sight is fully adjustable for elevation and windage with the front sight also adjustable for windage. The grips that come on the SR1911 are black rubberized double-diamond style with the Ruger logo, and provide decent retention of the handgun especially for the 10 mm Auto cartridge. The grips are the standard 1911 style, allowing many of the 1911 aftermarket grip options to be swapped on.

A closer look at the Bomar-style rear sight that is fully adjustable.
A closer look at the Bomar-style rear sight that is fully adjustable.

Other features include a flat main-spring housing that is checkered and an extended beavertail grip safety. The beavertail does a good job of separating the webbing of the user's hand from the travel path of the slide as it moves during recoil. The hammer is skeletonized along with the aluminum trigger-shoe. The combination of the skeletonized hammer and titanium firing pin decrease lock time. The trigger also features an adjustable over-travel stop that can be set through the use of a hex key.

A closer look at the black rubberized double-diamond  grips that come standard on the SR1911.
A closer look at the black rubberized double-diamond grips that come standard on the SR1911.

The thumb safety and slide-stop lever on the left side of the SR1911 frame are oversized to improve manipulation. The magazine release button is also extended outward for easier reach even without grips with a thumb recess. There is also an inspection port machined into the barrel to allow visual conformation of a loaded chamber. 

Shooting the Ruger SR1911 chambered in 10 mm Auto.
Shooting the Ruger SR1911 chambered in 10 mm Auto.

With the resurgence of the 10 mm Auto in popularity, the SR1911 brings the chambering in the familiarity of the 1911 style frame. The SR1911 handles the recoil of the cartridge well even through it uses the same spring set as those chambered in .45 ACP. The magazine capacity is eight rounds and overall weight comes in at 40.4 oz.   

For more information on the SR1911 chambered in 10 mm Auto, visit
ruger.com.

To watch complete segments of past episodes of American Rifleman TV, go to americanrifleman.org/artv. For all-new episodes of ARTV, tune in Wednesday nights to Outdoor Channel 8:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. EST.

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