Rifleman Review: Ruger Precision Rimfire

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posted on February 3, 2021
Sturm, Ruger & Co. released a bolt-action rimfire rifle outfitted in a manner similar to the company's existing Precision Rifle series, the Ruger Precision Rimfire. Chambered for .22 LR, the Ruger Precision Rimfire rifle comes in a chassis-style stock that mimics the features found on the chassis stock system on the larger centerfire Precision Rifle. The stock is made of durable glass-filled nylon.

Shooting the Ruger Precision Rimfire rifle.
Shooting the Ruger Precision Rimfire rifle.

The butt of the stock itself has a wide range of adjustments that can be made to the length-of-pull and comb height through the use of a quick-throw lever located on the right side of the cheek piece. Also found on the Precision Rimfire is a 15" anodized-aluminum fore-end that features M-LOK-compatible slots on the top, bottom and sides for the attachment of a wide range of accessories. 

The butt and cheek piece of the Ruger Precision Rimfire chassis is fully adjustable like the centerfire Ruger Precision Rifle series.
The butt and cheek piece of the Ruger Precision Rimfire chassis is fully adjustable like the centerfire Ruger Precision Rifle series.
The barrel on the Precision Rimfire is 18" with a fairly heavy profile compared to other .22 LR rifles on the market. The end of the barrel is also 1/2x28 t.p.i. threaded for the use of suppressors, and comes with a protective cap installed. One of the most unique features of the Precision Rimfire, though, is the adjustable length-of-travel on the bolt. The overall length of the platform is 35.13" to 38.63", depending on the stock adjustment. 

The 15" forend with M-Lock slots.
The 15" forend with M-Lock slots.

Standard length-of-travel for the bolt on the Precision Rimfire is 1.5", yet this can be changed to 3" of travel by removing a steel C-clip from the bolt. This increased length-of-travel on the bolt is meant to allow the Precision Rimfire to be used as a trainer in place of the centerfire Precision Rifle series, which naturally has the longer length-of-travel for its bolt than a standard bolt-action rimfire rifle. 

The length-of-travel on the bolt is adjustable from 1.5" to 3" by removing the steel C-clip on the center of the bolt.
The length-of-travel on the bolt is adjustable from 1.5" to 3" by removing the steel C-clip on the center of the bolt.

For shooting at extended ranges, at least for .22 LR, the Ruger Precision Rimfire also features an elevated Picatinny rail mount on top of the receiver for mounting optics. The chassis system also has an AR-15-style pistol grip and safety selector. The trigger is Ruger's Marksman adjustable trigger pack that can be set as low as 2.5 lbs. of pull weight. The Ruger Precision Rimfire is also compatible with the standard and extended Ruger 10-22 style magazines, and comes with a single BX-15 magazine with a capacity of 15 rounds. 

For more information on the Sturm, Ruger & Co. Ruger Precision Rimfire rifle chambered in .22 LR, visit ruger.com.  

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