The Marlin 336: One of 2019's Most-Popular Lever Guns

by
posted on July 7, 2020
marlin-336.jpg

The Marlin 336 was introduced to enthusiasts in 1948, although the overall design was a familiar one with lever-action fans. It’s a direct descendant of the company’s Model 1893, which went out of production in 1936 after more than 40 years.

Unlike its predecessor, though, its breech bolt is rounded and stronger, and the mainspring and trigger springs are coil instead of flat. The gun has a variety of other improved features that, cumulatively, continue to make it a perennial contender for the title of best-selling lever-action rifle to this day. In fact, last year it was the third-most-popular in that category among retailers using the services of GunBroker.com.

Side ejection gives the rifle a decidedly modern advantage over most other lever-actions—optics can be mounted. The 336 Dark model even comes with a rail atop the receiver to make the process fast and easy and another version even ships from the factory with a 3-9x32 mm riflescope already mounted and bore sighted.

It’s the classic look that attracted the more new owners in 2019, though. The wood stock with checkering at the wrist and fore-end were more popular than the laminated or railed polymer versions with a threaded barrel. It even outsold the Model 336C Curly Maple version, which is worth a double-take if you’re a lever-action fan. Most enthusiasts went with the stainless metal finish.

According to GunBroker, the most popular choice in chambering was another timeless one, .30-30 Win. The 336 is also available in .35 Rem., if you’re wondering. Versions with a 20-inch barrel won the competition, although there’s also a Compact variety that wears 16.5 incher.

All feature the company’s micro-groove rifling. There are 10 models from which to choose and MSRPs run from $693.67 to $1,059.94. The latter, the 336TDL Texas Deluxe, has B-grade American Walnut, light engraving and Marlin horse and rider inlaid in gold on the receiver.

Latest

Lupolead122
Lupolead122

2021 Rifle of the Year: Benelli Lupo

American Rifleman is pleased to announce 2021 Rifle of the Year goes to Benelli USA for its Lupo bolt action.

Sonoran Desert Institute Honored for Veteran Hiring Efforts

Sonoran Desert Institute was recognized by the U.S. Department of Labor for its efforts in hiring and recruiting veterans with the 2021 HIRE Vets Medallion Award.

NRA 150: First Gold For American Riflemen

The modern Olympics, as we know them today, started in 1896, and there were shooting events at the games as early as Athens in 1906. After all, the man who put the games together, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, was himself a French pistol champion. Neither the United States nor Great Britain sent rifle teams to Athens, but that changed for the 1908 Olympic Games in London.

New For 2021: Springfield Armory 1911 Ronin EMP

Springfield Armory blended features from its Ronin 1911 lineup with its popular carry-size EMP pistol to create a carry-friendly 1911 with top-tier elements.

​America’s First Sniper Rifle: The Telescopic-Sighted Krag-Jorgensen

The American Civil War was the first conflict in our nation’s history in which telescopic-sighted rifles were employed in combat to any appreciable extent. These muzzleloading, percussion rifles were fabricated by a number of civilian gunsmiths and gunsmithing firms, primarily for benchrest shooting matches.

The Armed Citizen® Nov. 29, 2021

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.