Ruger American Rimfire now with Go Wild Camo I-M Brush Stock

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posted on July 8, 2019
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Ruger has introduced three models of the Ruger American Rimfire rifle with Go Wild Camo I-M Brush stock and bronze Cerakote finish. Until now the finish has been available on the Ruger American center-fire rifle configuration. Offered in .22 LR, .22 WMR and .17 HMR, these new models are perfect for any rimfire application, from casual plinking to small game and varmint hunting at modest distances.



Similar to their center-fire counterparts, these new rimfire rifles feature a cold-hammer-forged barrel with a threaded muzzle and factory-installed muzzle brake. Patented Power Bedding positively locates the receiver and free floats the barrel.

These new offerings also feature the Ruger Modular Stock System and ship with a high comb, standard length of pull module—ideal for use with optics. Compact length of pull stock modules are available for purchase on ShopRuger.com. An easy-to-use extended magazine release provides a no-fuss removal of the provided flush-fit BX-style rotary magazine.

These new rifles also maintain the hallmark features of the Ruger American Rimfire rifle line: a factory-installed, one-piece aluminum scope rail; 60-degree bolt throw for ample scope clearance; an easy-to-actuate tang safety; and the Ruger Marksman Adjustable trigger. For more, visit Ruger.com.







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