Rifleman Q&A: Souvenir Mauser 1914 Pistol

posted on December 7, 2015
mauser1914.jpg

Q: I am looking for some help with a pistol I inherited from my grandfather. One of his brothers brought it home as a souvenir after World War II. The gun has no Nazi markings. To the best of my knowledge, my grandfather never fired it. Am I the lucky owner of something awesome or just fortunate to have inherited grandpa’s gun?

A: Your pistol is a Mauser Model 1914, which is chambered in 7.65 mm Browning (the American .32 ACP) cartridge. It is a slightly larger version of the .25 ACP Model 1910. The Model 1914, like the Model 1910, is a striker-fired, blowback-operated pistol. The Model 1914 has a 3.42" barrel and an eight-round-capacity detachable box magazine with its release on the frame’s heel. The rear of the striker protruded through the back of the slide, serving as a cocking indicator. There is a manual safety on the frame’s left, and the slide locks back on an empty magazine.

These guns were made from 1914 until 1934. A change to the shape of the grip frame resulted in the .32 ACP Model 1934, and the design was gradually replaced by the double-action Mauser HSc. The Model 1914 was a popular commercial gun in its day and was used through both world wars by various German police agencies and military units.

To me, any gun with a family connection is “awesome,” but you are fortunate in that the Model 1914 is a very interesting pistol. 


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