NRA Gun of the Week: Rock River Arms BT9 R9 Competition

posted on September 4, 2020
The BT9 R9 Competition carbine from Rock River Arms (RRA) is a 9 mm Luger-chambered semi-automatic based loosely on the AR-15 design. Growing interest in pistol-caliber carbines has resulted in Rock River Arms’ latest offering. A two-part receiver set enhances the functionality of the platform and allows shooters to customize with aftermarket AR-15-style parts and accessories. Smartly, RRA devised its lower receiver for use with popular 9 mm magazine pattern from Glock.

Right-side view of Rock River Arms BT9 R9 Compeition black carbine shown on white background with text on images noting make and model.

A 16” chrome-moly steel barrel come standard on the BT9 R9, which is threaded and includes RRA’s 9 mm Mini Brake. Covering most of the barrel is a 15” RRA lighweight handguard that features M-Lok slots for accessories. The aluminum handguard is fitted to the company’s extruded aluminum receiver with Picatinny rail covering the top side for easily attaching optics. RRA includes its Operator CAR stock, which is six-position adjustable as well as a rubber grip from Hogue.

Close-up view of the right side of a Rock River Arms 9 mm shown with clear magazine on a white background.

Our experience at the range proved the BT9 R9 Competition to be a smooth-shooting carbine. RRA’s two-stage trigger broke crisply and reset quickly. The gun’s 6.8-lb. weight combined with its pistol-caliber chambering and the addition of a Mini Brake at the muzzle allowed for fast and accurate follow-up shots on target.

Man wearing protective shooting gear on a shooting range holding a black rifle in his hands.

Watch our NRA Gun of the Week video, above, to learn more about the Rock River Arms BT9 R9 Competition carbine.

Rock River Arms BT9 R9 Competition Specifications
Manufacturer: Rock River Arms
Action Type: blowback-operated semi-automatic rifle
Chambering: 9 mm Luger
Upper Receiver: extruded aluminum
Lower Receiver: machined aluminum
Barrel: 16"chrome-moly steel
Trigger: two-stage; 4-lb., 7-oz. pull
Stock: six-position adjustable
Weight: 6 lbs., 12 ozs. empty
MSRP: $1,275

Further Reading:
Review: Rock River Arms LAR-47 X-1
Handgun Hard Choices: Colt M1911 or S&W M1917?
6 Tactical Lever-Action Rifles Available in 2020
Big-Bore AR Cartridges
Rock River Arms LAR-8 Standard Operator

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