Lights On Long Guns

by
posted on April 7, 2014
201042283345-accessory-array_ms.jpg

Setting up a white light on a long gun can be somewhat frustrating in that the device can take up a good bit of rail space, the activation control can end up in an awkward-to-reach location and mounting fittings can become complicated. Here are a few tips to make the process easier:

You'll need to "map out" the setup before buying the parts. If possible, try to position the light on the side of the gun that makes most sense for its particular method of activation by your support hand thumb or fingers. If you prefer to always activate long gun lights with the same digit, and you have multiple, different, platforms on which you wish to mount lights, strive to retain that consistency so that your "muscle memory" for that task transfers from platform to platform. For instance if you're a right-hander and you mount a light on your AR's right-hand fore-end rail, you'll have to run a tape switch to the left-hand rail to activate it if you want to do so with your support-hand thumb.

If you're mounting a Grip Pod, however, you may be able to use that company's factory rail accessory to mount a light on the unit's right side and simply bump the tailcap switch with your left-hand thumb since it will naturally fall in that area when that hand is in position on the Grip Pod's vertical section.

Regardless of how you do it, the simpler you can keep the installation the better. The more Velcro, wires and switches there are, the more things can go wrong when gear starts getting dragged across the ground or through bushes. Some so-called "weapon lights" have built-in Picatinny mounts. Otherwise, any quality flashlight that can stand up to recoil and that has a 1" diameter body can be mounted with a simple riflescope ring. Wire ties or gaffer's tape can help to secure loose wires for tailcap switches. Just don't forget to keep a few spare batteries with the gun.

What suggestions do you have for mounting lights on long guns?

Latest

right side bolt-action rifle gray wood silver metal steel stainless
right side bolt-action rifle gray wood silver metal steel stainless

NRA Gun of the Week: Kimber 84M Pro Varmint

On this week’s “Gun of the Week” video preview, watch as American Rifleman staff take a short-action Kimber 84M rifle to the range for discussion.

The Armed Citizen® Oct. 15, 2021

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

Rifleman Q&A: M1 Garand Vs. M1 Carbine Rebarrels

It seems to me that few World War II-vintage M1 Garand rifles retain their original barrels today, whereas most M1 Carbines of the same era I have seen still have the original barrels?

Record Setting Participation In USA Clay Target League Fall Season

This fall season of the USA Clay Target League has reached new heights, with a record breaking 651 high school and college teams, equating to 11,783 of the young enthusiasts, participating.

NRA Museums: 85 Years Of Preserving The Past For The Future

In June 1923, the Official Journal of the National Rifle Association became The American Rifleman, a bi-monthly publication with a staff that included Maj. Julian S. Hatcher, Lt. Col. Townsend Whelen, Capt. Charles Askins, Sr. and a host of others whose names read like a who’s who of legendary gun writers and experts.

Savage A17: The Semi-Automatic .17 HMR Rifle

Introduced in 2015, the Savage A17 rifle line was one of the first semi-automatics to be chambered for the tiny but hot .17 HMR cartridge. 

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.