Leupold Custom Shop Introduces MOA-based TS-32X1 Reticle

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posted on December 11, 2013
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Leupold has introduced the new TS-32X1 reticle, a minute-of-angle (MOA) based system that's designed to allow for precision shots without the need for dial adjustments.

A heavy post and thin stadia crosshair features 1-MOA hashmarks on both the TS-32X1's horizontal and vertical lines. Every other hash mark on the horizontal stadia is slightly longer, providing quick and easy 2-MOA measurements. Every four MOA is indicated by a number.

Leupold has also set up the vertical stadia with 1-MOA tics and longer 2-MOA marks. Every fourth mark is numbered, all the way to the complete 32-MOA elevation range. Wind dots in the lower half of the reticle are spaced in 2 MOA increments, both vertically and horizontally. The system allows for immediate and precise holdovers and wind holds, as well as range estimation.

The TS-32X1 is the first in a family of MOA-based reticles that will cover several magnification ranges. It's currently available for the second focal place VX-3, VX-III, Vari-X II and Mark 4 4.5-14 LR/T riflescopes. Existing riflescopes can be retrofitted for $159.99 through the Leupold Custom Shop.

Adding the TS-32X1 to a new riflescope ordered through the company's Custom Shop will cost consumers $129.99.

For more information, go to Leupold.com.

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