Fear & Loading: THE First Responder

by
posted on June 26, 2015
first-responder-2.jpg

The odds are good you have a first-aid kit in your shooting bag or vehicle’s trunk when you head to the range, but are the contents truly capable of plugging a life-threatening leak? I was confident in mine, until I got a good look at the TMS Outdoors lineup.  

Organized shooting ranges have at least one serious first-aid kit and a good range manager reminds you regularly of its location, but it’s usually a long way from the firing line. Yes, accidents are rare and usually of the “boo boo” variety. More than likely, you’ve doctored up more than one scope-eye victim with your personal gear instead of heading all the way back to the clubhouse or office.

If the unthinkable happens, though, you may not have the right equipment in your kit to plug a serious leak. The time and distance it takes to get to the clubhouse/office could prove fatal and there’s a slight chance there are no trauma bandages there, anyway. Good luck stopping a serious leak with finger cots and Band-Aids.

Thankfully, there’s an eloquent and affordable solution offered by a group of former Green Beret medics who witnessed the effectiveness of individual first-aid kits (IFAKs) during their deployments. TMS Outdoors products harness the power of lifesaving IFAKs in civilian-friendly gear.

Bulky and heavy kits don’t cut it in combat, and even civilians leave oversized gear behind first. The company recognizes that fact, so all of its kits are “low drag.” Its Hunter’s Trauma Kit Operator Advanced, for example, measures 7 1/4 x4 5/8x3 1/4 inches and tips the scale at only 13.88 ounces. Yet, it contains an SOF Tourniquet, Tramedic Trauma Bandage, Petro Gauze and tape board, antibiotic ointment, non-latex gloves, QuickClot Sport, lip balm, and, of course, Band-Aids.

The case’s clamshell-style design opens into two halves, providing quick, no fumbling, access to all the gear. It’s made of heavy nylon to survive years of abuse and is molle attachable. In addition, 2-inch zipper pulls minimize headaches when wearing gloves. Instructions are also included, although you probably won’t have the time to read them if the unthinkable happens—so consider taking a first-aid course.

MSRP on this model is $89.99 at Cabela’s, or a less expensive alternative is to simply add the company’s Operator Advanced Trauma Kit to your current first-aid gear. Personally, I’m retiring my old version. It’s fat, heavy, makes me feel like a mouse looking for cheese every time I navigate its maze of layers and compartments and—despite the bulk—won’t handle a serious case of the leaks.

Latest

Delta
Delta

Review: Leupold DeltaPoint Micro

Leupold’s DeltaPoint Micro doesn’t look like any other slide-mounted optic. Rather than using a flat-bottomed design, the DP Micro features an L-shaped mounting surface that covers the top-rear portion of its host’s slide, with a small 9 mm lens sitting atop the gun and the battery compartment overhanging the aft of the slide.

Streamlight Donations Support for Breast Cancer Research

For the past 13 years, Streamlight has donated proceeds from sales of the pink lights to support the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Preview: NoSweat Baseball Hat Liners

NoSweat disposable hat liners instantly absorb sweat and wick it away from the user’s skin, reducing odor, stains and obstructed vision.

ARTV Preview: New Colt Wheel Guns, Kel-Tec P17 and The Gewehr 33/40

This week on American Rifleman Television, we go behind-the-scenes to see how Colt makes its revolvers, test the Kel-Tec P17 pistol and examine the history of the German Gewehr 33/40 rifle.

The Armed Citizen® July 26, 2021

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

Preview: Springfield Hellcat 15-Round Magazine

Do you have a hungry Hellcat? Check out this latest enhancement for Springfield Armory’s micro-compact pistol.

Interests



Subscribe to the NRA American Rifleman newsletter