1911 Handling

by
posted on January 29, 2014
wiley-clapp.jpg

When I first began shooting the 1911 in competition, I was in the Marine Corps of the early 1960s. The game was NRA Outdoor Pistol-slow, timed and rapid-one handed at 50 and 25 yards. The Corps put a lot of emphasis on the sport, with Division and Marine Corps matches conducted to select the team that went to Camp Perry for the Nationals. The season started in the spring and ended after Perry. At the beginning of the Division Matches, we spent several weeks working with a training team from Marksmanship Training Unit. Issued guns were built up before each season by RTE (Rifle Team Equipment) armorers.

It was in this period of training that I was taught to handle my issued match gun in a particular way. When I mentioned this technique in another training atmosphere recently, nobody had heard of it. For a right-handed shooter I was taught to have the slide locked open and to insert a loaded magazine and fully seat it. Then, with the thumb of the left hand to hold the tip of the hammer down and release the slide lock with the right thumb. This allowed the slide to run forward, chambering a round and leaving the hammer cocked. Thus did you prepare for a string of fire.

The maneuver was said to help the longevity of the trigger job by keeping the nose of the sear out of engagement as the slide slammed violently forward. It is opposite from the combat shooter, who loads his pistol by pulling the slide fully to the rear and releasing it, which insures greater slide travel-as happens when a round is fired-and better functional reliability. I am just wondering whether or not any reader remembers this or has any comment on its value.

Latest

Springfield Armory Emissary 1911 New 2021 F
Springfield Armory Emissary 1911 New 2021 F

New for 2021: Springfield Armory Emissary 1911

Springfield Armory's new Emissary 1911 combines the features of today's cutting-edge defensive 1911 with some of the best custom features you can find in the handgun market.

ARTV: The Kel-Tec Story

Watch this segment of American Rifleman Television, originally aired in 2019, to learn about the history, manufacturing principles and firearm designs offered by Kel-Tec Firearms, located in Cocoa, Fla.

Review: Leupold DeltaPoint Micro

Leupold’s DeltaPoint Micro doesn’t look like any other slide-mounted optic. Rather than using a flat-bottomed design, the DP Micro features an L-shaped mounting surface that covers the top-rear portion of its host’s slide, with a small 9 mm lens sitting atop the gun and the battery compartment overhanging the aft of the slide.

Streamlight Donations Support for Breast Cancer Research

For the past 13 years, Streamlight has donated proceeds from sales of the pink lights to support the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Preview: NoSweat Baseball Hat Liners

NoSweat disposable hat liners instantly absorb sweat and wick it away from the user’s skin, reducing odor, stains and obstructed vision.

ARTV Preview: New Colt Wheel Guns, Kel-Tec P17 and The Gewehr 33/40

This week on American Rifleman Television, we go behind-the-scenes to see how Colt makes its revolvers, test the Kel-Tec P17 pistol and examine the history of the German Gewehr 33/40 rifle.

Interests



Subscribe to the NRA American Rifleman newsletter