Review: Kimber K6s DASA 4" Combat Revolver

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posted on March 25, 2021
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Kimber America is commonly credited as making some of the finest production M1911 handguns and bolt-action rifles on the market. But, in 2016, the company decided to branch out into a completely new arena—revolvers.

That initial product, the compact K6s, was an instant success on the concealed carry market, but it left the consumer wanting a larger, more range-friendly variant. Just a few years later, Kimber expanded the line and granted that wish by introducing a variety of exposed-hammer derivatives of the original double-action-only design designated for open carry, home defense or target shooting. Among these was the K6s DASA 4" Combat reviewed here.

Kimber’s new revolver is a double-action/single-action, center-fire design chambered in .357 Mag. As such, it can be fired by simply depressing the trigger for a long, deliberate double-action break, or manually cocked for a lighter, shorter single-action one. The cylinder holds six rounds of .357 Mag. or .38 Spl. ammunition, and is claimed to be the smallest six-shot cylinder in this chambering on the market.

The cylinder rotates counterclockwise, which is useful to note when loading and firing anything less than a full cylinder. A frame-mounted, push-button-style cylinder release allows the cylinder to swing out of the left side of the frame. Unloading is via a typical spring-loaded ejector rod. This rod remains inside of a recess located under the barrel to protect it from getting snagged against anything during use or carry.

Kimber K6s DASA 4" Combat
The DASA 4" Combat’s three-dot sights consist of a dovetailed rear (r.) and a fixed-post front (l.). The sixshooter’s checkered walnut stocks are secured to the frame via a single screw, and the left one is relieved to accommodate a speed loader (below, inset).


Both the frame and barrel of the K6s DASA Combat are made from solid stainless steel, which is inherently weatherproof. All exterior parts are brush-finished for an attractive matte appearance. A windage-adjustable rear sight is mounted to the frame via a dovetail cut, and a fixed blade is pinned into place on the barrel. Both sights are matte black and feature large white dots to aid in their rapid acquisition.

The package is completed with a pair of walnut stocks affixed to the frame with a single screw. The fullsize grip shape features deep finger grooves and diamond checkering to help the shooter retain consistent purchase during sustained fire and to provide comfort during extended range sessions. Other features of the K6s DASA that are designed to aid in manipulation of the revolver are the knurled ejector rod tip, the cross-hatching on both the cylinder release and the hammer spur, and a serrated backstrap.

The Kimber K6s DASA 4" Combat is devoid of external safeties. The heavy double-action trigger weight provides the shooter some level of security when holstering, while passive safeties ensure that it will not fire if dropped or jarred. These safeties include both a rebound and a transfer bar, which is a unique design as these parts are independent of each other. This independence ensures continued safety should one fail. Together these provide two layers of confidence, and users do not need to shy away from carrying a round under the hammer.

Before our range session, we used a Lyman Digital Trigger Gauge to measure the effort required to discharge the firearm in both modes. In double-action, we determined an average pull weight of 9 lbs., 10 ozs., and the trigger movement was smooth and maintained consistent resistance throughout its travel. The single-action pull was extraordinary, breaking at just 3 lbs., 6 ozs. No take-up or creep was present in the single-action trigger movement, and both modes ended with just 1/10" of overtravel.

From a Caldwell rest, we fired .357 Mag. ammunition from Winchester and SIG, as well as some .38 Spl. from American Eagle by Federal. Recoil was manageable and muzzle rise wasn’t as bad as one might expect from a mid-size revolver. At nearly 29 ozs., the K6s 4" Combat absorbed much of the magnum’s recoil and was downright pleasant to shoot with the .38 Spl. rounds.

All loads tested produced more than acceptable accuracy for combat effectiveness, and the new revolver shot particularly well with the Winchester 158-gr. hollow points, producing 15-yd. groups as small as 1.97" in diameter. All accuracy testing was conducted in single-action mode, while the remainder of the rounds were fired for function in double action.

kimber k6s dasa 4" combat shooting results


Our time with the Kimber K6s DASA 4" Combat was a thoroughly enjoyable experience. Even those testers who have shunned revolvers in the past found themselves firing more rounds than required for the evaluation. The combination of the gun’s ergonomics, recoil recovery and striking aesthetics make it a great option for those looking for a revolver to protect themselves inside of the home, along the trail or as a backup firearm on a hunt.

kimber k6s dasa 4" combat specs

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