NRA Gun of the Week: Glock 43

Glock was a bit late to the party when it introduced its Model 43 pistol earlier in 2015, but judging by consumer response, loyal Glock fans have all but forgotten that the company had yet to offer a single-stack defensive 9 mm in its extensive catalog of polymer-framed handguns. After all, Glock has been one of the top providers worldwide of combat pistols for more than 20 years, and has built its reputation around its double-column magazine. So how does it compare to its closest Glock brethren in terms of size? External dimensions place it right between the G42 .380 ACP (introduced a year earlier) and the double-stack G26 9 mm, but aesthetically, the G43 is essentially a slightly larger G42. And equally important, it retains the very-identifiable signature Glock shape.

But how does it shoot? Since the Glock 43 introduction was one 2015’s unexpected surprises in the world of concealable handguns, we chose it to kick off our relaunch of AmericanRIfleman.org's popular "NRA Gun of the Week" series. Watch the video above as Mark Keefe gives a complete rundown of the pistol’s features—a few of which are new for Glock—and then sends some rounds down range.

For more on the Glock 43, please enjoy the following articles:

Keefe Report: Range Time with the Glock 43 
Keefe Report: So, What Took So Long? The Glock G43 

Glock 43 Specifications
Manufacturer: Glock Inc. Model: 43
Action: Double-Action, striker-fired, center-fire
Caliber: .9 mm Luger
Frame: Reinforced polymer
Slide: Steel
Sights: White Outlined Square Notch Rear; Single Dot, Post Front
Barrel: 3.39”
Twist: 1:9.84” RH
Trigger: 5-lb. 8-oz. Pull
Magazine: 6-Round Detachable Box
Finish: Matte Blue
Overall Length: 6.26”
Weight: 17.95 ozs.
Accessories: Owner’s Manual, Scope, Lock
MSRP: $552

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