The Future of the Gun

by
posted on September 30, 2014
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In The Future Of The Gun, Frank Miniter, who is one of the finest writers and investigative journalists I know, does a remarkable job describing the context and history of firearms in America, and then delves into their contemporary lawful and positive use. But it is in analyzing the criminal use of firearms, and the effect government restriction of gun rights has had on our society, that this book makes its most dramatic impact on the national debate. Woven into his narrative is the history and big picture of firearm manufacturing in the United States (guns kick started the Industrial Revolution) and what effect technological developments are having and will have on firearms in the near future.

As Miniter writes, “There are two wildly different gun cultures in America—the freedom loving, gun-rights culture that upholds the responsible use of guns for hunting, sport and self-defense, and the criminal culture that thrives in spite of, or even because of, government attempts at restricting gun rights. Those two cultures lead to different futures. The path we take will determine the future of the gun and the future of our freedom.”

Miniter went inside both those cultures, talking with felons and inner-city gang members and then BATFE agents. He interviewed firearm company CEOs, NRA’s top leadership, competitive shooters and many others in between. He covers the gun’s place and relevance in our society, the impact legislation has had on firearms use and design, and then he delves into where technology is taking firearm development.

One of the more interesting chapters, “What Happens to Disarmed Peoples,” concludes with, “More guns in the hands of law-abiding citizens not only means less crime, it means more liberty, more courage and a more self-reliant people.” Hardcover, 6"x9", 256 pps. Price: $28. Contact: Regnery Publishing, Inc.; 300 New Jersey Ave. NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20001; (888) 219-4747; regnery.com.

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