Nesika Sporter Rifle

by
posted on June 30, 2014
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Nesika actions have been well-known for decades to the world’s elite competitive shooting teams such as the Army Marksmanship Unit and other civilian competitors. In fact, in 2003, Benchrest champion Kyle Brown shot a 10-shot, 1,000-yard group that measured under 4.25”.

Today, with three complete models of rifles-sporter, long-range and tactical-the Nesika brand is fast taking its place among other respected well-known names such as Remington.

Although all three models are production rifles, each is built by hand one at a time with what might be considered custom features on other manufacturer’s guns. An action machined from 15-5 steel that boasts 2/1000ths of an inch tolerance, a 3-lb. Timney trigger and a one-piece bolt forged from 4340 CM steel are standard on the Sporter model.

Nesika rifles and actions are manufactured in Sturgis, S.D. The company was purchased by Dakota Arms in 2003, which in turn was purchased by the Freedom Group in 2009, thus making Nesika a Freedom Group brand.

American Hunter Executive Editor Adam Heggenstaller has put the Sporter rifle with its famous Nesika Hunter action to the test on both Auodad in West Texas and bear in northwestern Pennsylvania. Admittedly not a benchrest gun, it still produced impressive results. Watch the video below as Adam spells out the details of our latest Gun of the Week.

Technical Specifications:

Caliber: 7 mm-.08 Rem.; .30-06 Spg. ;308 Win.; .280 Rem; 7 mm Rem.; .300 Win. Mag. (tested)
Barrel: Douglas Air-Gauged
Stock:
 Bell and Carlson Hand Laid-up Composite with Aluminum Bedding Block
Reciever: 15-5 Stainless
Bolt:
 One-Piece from 4340 CM Steel
Trigger:
 TImney set at 3 lbs.
Bases:
 Leupold QRW
Weight:
 8 lbs.
Length:
 24” and 26”
MSRP:
 $3,499

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