EAA ABDO: A Gun Safe For My Hip

posted on May 13, 2016
safe.jpg

I have always been a fan of discrete ways to carry guns, especially micro or subcompact pistols. When the EAA ABDO landed on our desks, immediately I thought it looked exactly like a slightly larger version of my iPhone wrapped in its rather hefty and secure case. Just as my cell phone is an investment worth protecting, so is my sidearm.

Made of reinforced nylon, the inside measures 3.7" wide by 5.2" tall. The firearm is retained—switchable for left- and right-hand carry—by a vertical barrel pin. The retention pin is customizable to provide all three conditions of carry. Due to its size, without delving into the tablet-size case realm, the user is limited to the company’s “fit list,” which does include most popular so-called ”mouse guns.” The ABDO is secured to the user via a replaceable spring-steel clip. 

Employing the safe is as simple as sliding the top latch fore or aft depending on weak- or strong-side carry. The safe door then drops free with assistance from two torsion springs contained on the hinge pin. For testing I used a Kel-Tec P-3AT, and once the door escaped my finger tips, the gun was easily accessible and presented in a vertical position ready for withdrawal. The safe is lockable via the supplied key. Price $50. Contact: European American Armory (Dept. AR), P.O. Box 560746, Rockledge, FL 32956-0746; (321) 639-4842; eaacorp.com.

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