CZ Model 75 Pistol

by
posted on May 12, 2009
20095199217-cz75pistol_fs.jpg

The Czech CZ 75, designed by Josef and Frantisek Koucky, was introduced in 1975 by Ceska Zbrojovka, Uhersky Brod. The short-recoil 9 mm Parabellum double-action with its 15-round magazine was applauded in these pages (September 1981, p. 48), but it was not expected to appear here in large numbers because of import restrictions against what was then Communist Czechoslovakia.

The first CZ 75s, with rough finishes, wood stocks, lanyard rings, rowel hammers and no half-cock notches, were difficult for U.S. citizens to buy, with the usual route of acquisition being through Canada. To fill perceived U.S. demand, manufacturers in other countries soon began to make close copies of the pistol and, since the 1980s, many have been imported here-some in 9x21 mm, .40 S&W and .41 AE cals.

From Switzerland, with early assistance from CZ, and from Muller in England, came the ITM AT-84 and the Sphinx AT-2000 line. Italy's Tanfoglio gave us the TZ-75 and Springfield Armory's P9 series and continues with European American Armory's extensive Witness line of variations. Israel Military Industries, using some Tanfoglio parts, made the Jericho 941 and the current Magnum Research Baby Desert Eagle.

In 1992, Action Arms, which had gone through many fits and starts with the ITM/Muller guns, finally got on track when Czechoslovakia earned most-favored-nation trading status, making the Czech-made pistol readily importable together with the 1986-developed CZ 85 with ambidextrous slide release and safety levers. The .40 S&W chambering was added to the CZ 75 line in 1997, discontinued, then returned in 1999. CZ has since set up its own importer, CZ-USA in Kansas City, Kan., and currently imports literally dozens of full-size and compact models and variations in 9 mm or .40 S&W. The 1998-introduced CZ 97 B brought the .45 ACP chambering to the design, and there is even a .22 LR Kadet variant.

The CZ 75 and its descendants now occupy a considerable part of the imported high-capacity, double-action autoloader market. Its applications for home defense, service pistol use and practical pistol competition will ensure the CZ's influence for a long time to come.

The accompanying instructions are for the basic CZ 75 and apply to most of its variants, though there are differences in safety and trigger systems.

Disassembly
Depress the magazine catch on the left side of the frame, remove the magazine and retract the slide to ensure that the chamber is empty, then release the slide. Bring the hammer to the full cock position and retract the slide about 1/4" to align the witness marks on the left side of the slide and frame. The rear sight may be used to aid in gripping the slide. Next, press in on the slide stop pin projecting from the right side of the frame and lift it out from the left side. The slide may now be pulled forward and lifted off the frame. Turn the slide upside down and retract the recoil spring to allow removal of the recoil spring and recoil spring guide. The barrel may then be removed from the slide. Further disassembly is not recommended, unless performed by a qualified gunsmith. Reassembly is carried out in the reverse order.

Latest

Campbell .32 20WCF 1
Campbell .32 20WCF 1

The .32-20 Winchester Center Fire: History & Performance

Born from a desire for a faster and flatter shooting cartridge, the .32-20 Winchester Center Fire cartridge came to the world stage at the end of the 19th century as a popular option for revolvers and lever-action rifles alike, but its popularity eventually dwindled as the 20th century progressed.

Tavor X95: The Updated Israeli Bullpup

Unveiled in 2016 and claiming a prestigious NRA Publication’s Golden Bullseye award by the next year, the Tavor X95 was a commerical success and improved upon the design of the original Tavor SAR. 

NRA Gun of the Week: Kimber 84M Pro Varmint

On this week’s “Gun of the Week” video preview, watch as American Rifleman staff take a short-action Kimber 84M rifle to the range for discussion.

The Armed Citizen® Oct. 15, 2021

Read today's "The Armed Citizen" entry for real stories of law-abiding citizens, past and present, who used their firearms to save lives.

Rifleman Q&A: M1 Garand Vs. M1 Carbine Rebarrels

It seems to me that few World War II-vintage M1 Garand rifles retain their original barrels today, whereas most M1 Carbines of the same era I have seen still have the original barrels?

Record Setting Participation In USA Clay Target League Fall Season

This fall season of the USA Clay Target League has reached new heights, with a record breaking 651 high school and college teams, equating to 11,783 of the young enthusiasts, participating.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.