CVA Hunter: A Top-Selling Single-Shot Rifle

by
posted on November 15, 2020
cva-hunter.jpg

Connecticut Valley Arms, more affectionately known by enthusiasts as CVA since its 1971 founding, has an enviable reputation for creating firearms with the kind of accuracy that defies price point. They’re built in Bergara, Spain, a region renowned for its gunmaking for hundreds of years. With that kind of expertise gathering in its factory every work day, combined with cutting-edge machining and precision engineering, it’s little wonder the firm’s products have caught the attention of gun owners.

The company may be best known for its tack-driving muzzleloaders and, most recently, bolt actions, but its single shots reflect the same quality found throughout all of its lines. Firearm enthusiasts have taken note, and the CVA Hunter ranked No. 6 among the single shots sold by retailers on GunBroker.com last year.

Unfortunately, the Hunter was discontinued for 2020 and was replaced in the line by the Scout. CVA still lists the Hunter .45-70 Gov’t-chambered Blued with Black Stock model as available from the company, while supplies last, undoubtedly.

As with all Hunter models, a DuraSight rail on the receiver ensures headache-free optic mounting, controls are fully ambidextrous and each have a reversible cocking spur. They come with a CrushZone recoil pad, extractor and they’re covered by the company’s lifetime warrantee. If you’re lucky you might find a used model or a dealer with remaining inventory of these rifles chambered in .243 Win., .44 Mag., .35 Whelen.

The available-for-now model, the Blued with Black Stock, is chambered for .45-70 Gov’t and has a blued steel barrel that measures 25-inches. Twist rate is 1:20. It tips the scales at 8 pounds and overall length is 41 inches. Length of pull comes in at 14 inches. The composite stock is black and MSRP is $286.50—while they last.

Latest

Real Avid Bore Max
Real Avid Bore Max

Preview: Real Avid Bore-Max Speed Clean System

Real Avid introduces a new set of bore brushes, jags and jag patches, aimed at simplifying the process of cleaning out barrels with fewer passes needed.

American Arms of the Battle of the Bulge

American G.I.s thwarted Hitler’s last-ditch offensive, even though Hitler threw the best men and weapons that he had available against America's troops in the Ardennes. Here the author looks at the small arms used by our troops to stop the Nazi war machine dead in its tracks.

Heckler & Koch P7: H&K's 'Squeeze-Cocking' Pistol

First designed in 1976, Heckler & Koch's P7 gas-delayed blowback pistol stand out from most all other handguns with its unique squeeze-cocking mechanism.

M1903A4 Development: The U.S. Army’s Search for a Sniper Rifle

Despite the lessons learned during World War I, the U.S. Army lacked a purpose-built sniper rifle throughout the interwar period, even after efforts were made to develop one. The need became more apparent as World War II loomed, leading to the adoption of the M1903A4, with its developmental history explored here.

The Rock Island Arsenal Model of 1903

Although the names “Springfield” and “’03” are virtually synonymous, that gives short shrift to the other
government facility that made the venerable “U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, Model of 1903”—The Rock Island Arsenal.

NRA Gun of the Week: Hi-Point Firearms C9

On this week’s “Gun of the Week” video preview, American Rifleman staff examines a budget-friendly semi-automatic pistol from Hi-Point Firearms.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.