NRA Gun of the Week: Ruger Precision Rimfire Rifle

by
posted on July 21, 2018

Marksmanship training can get costly, and that is why Ruger developed and brought to market its Precision Rimfire—a full-featured bolt-action rifle modeled after its center-fire Precision Rifle. The Ruger Precision Rimfire utilizes an 18”, cold-hammer-forged steel, target barrel mounted to the American Rimfire bolt-action receiver. This barreled action is set within a polymer chassis that contains an adjustable stock that allows shooters to fine-tune both the rifle’s length of pull and comb height. Rimfire rifles are a hot topic today, with leagues and matches popping up all across the country that push these little lead chuckers to once-unheard-of distances. Coincidentally, the Precision Rimfire includes a 30 m.o.a. optic rail to assist with sighting at these extended ranges. To learn more about the feature-rich Ruger Precision Rimfire, check out our NRA Gun of the Week video hosted by American Rifleman’s Brian Sheetz.

Specifications:
Manufacturer: Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc.
Model: Ruger Precision Rimfire
Chambering: .22 Long Rifle
Action Type: bolt-action, repeating rimfire rifle
Receiver: CNC-machined, 4140 chrome-moly steel
Barrel: 18”, cold-hammer-forged 1137 steel; threaded ½x28
Finish: matte black
Stock: adjustable cheekpiece and length of pull
Trigger: Ruger Marksman Adjustable, single-stage; 2-lb., 6-oz. pull
Sights: none; 30 m.o.a. integral scope rail
Magazine: Ruger BX15; 15-round detachable box
Weight: 7 lbs., 7 ozs.
MSRP: $529

Additional Reading:
Editors’ Picks 2018: Ruger Precision Rimfire Rifle
SHOT Show 2018: Ruger Precision Rimfire
Tested: Ruger Precision Rimfire Rifle
Drilling Down Into Ruger’s Past
Snapshot: Practical Rimfire Challenge











  
























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