SHOT Show 2018: Cimarron 1862 Colt Pocket .380 ACP Conversion Revolver

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posted on February 1, 2018
cimarron_lede_1862_380_01s.jpg

Last year, Cimarron Firearms gave some folks a sneak peek at an 1862 Colt Pocket .380 ACP Conversion revolver that was still in the prototype phase. At this year's SHOT Show, we got to see early production models with deliver dates planned for early 2018. The company is now in the final process of obtaining approval from the ATF, so no firm dates have been pinned down as of yet.

This five-shot replica of the black powder Colt Pocket Navy single-action revolver comes equipped with the new patented automatic safety. Built into the interior of the hammer, it goes undetected when the gun is assembled so that it won't detract from this revolver's authentic appearance and operation. Rather than converting the gun to fire some obscure or hard-to-find antique revolver cartridge, the cylinder chambers the ubiquitous .380 ACP.

There is no loading gate on this gun (which is historically accurate). Instead, the cylinder indexes in such a way that the rims of the cartridges rest against the interior of the frame on either side of the opening to prevent them from falling out. Several folks seem really concerned about this. Years ago, I worked with a USFA SHOT revolver chambered in .45 Colt/.410 (the gun never made it to market) that also had no loading gate. I had no problems with shells staying put until the hammer was placed in the half-cocked position and the cylinder rotated accordingly. I think this 1862 Colt Pocket revolver will be just as easy to use. 

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