Souvenir Knife

by
posted on May 6, 2014
qa-knife1.jpg

Q. I have received a knife from my father-in-law who was in the Army surplus business after World War II. Among other items he kept was this knife marked “U.S. Army D.D. Sraku & Co.” on the blade and “G 10” on the sheath. The blade is about 12" long, and the handle is about 4½" long. The knife is pretty crude but well put together. The blade was shaped with a file. The writing on the blade looks like the letters were scratched in, then filled with brass and filed off flush. You had a very nice article a year or so ago about U.S. military knives. Perhaps you could tell me something about this knife.

A. As a member of the Army serving in the Pacific Islands during World War II, I have seen many types of knives similar to the one now in your possession. Many of the soldiers had these knives made by local craftsmen, especially when we entered the Philippines. In addition, when ashore, the sailors were apt to buy anything that would appear to have been in battle. A great number of these-I call them “souvenirs”-were brought back by servicemen at the war’s end.

I cannot locate any information on the manufacturing company that is on the blade of your knife. This could be of an organization that was not in the United States, or it was put there by the craftsman, and/or company that originally made the knife.

-Harry Hunter

Originally published October, 2006

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