Range Tested: Savage 110 Ultralite Rifle

posted on September 10, 2020

Originally introduced in 1958, Savage’s Model 110 is one of the oldest continuously produced American rifle designs on the market. During its more than 60 years of manufacture, the company’s 110 has be configured to suit nearly every task and purpose required by American sportsmen, including models designed to be light in hand for portage over tough terrain. The 110 Ultralite takes that concept to the next level.

The Savage Ultralite is built on the standard-length 110-pattern action, and it is currently available in 8 chamberings from 6.5 Creedmoor up to .30-‘06 Springfield.

The Ultralite is wearing the company’s relatively new AccuStock. The polymer construction makes the stock lightweight and weatherproof and the polymer inserts still allow the rifle to be fit to the user in terms of comb height and length of pull.

The Ultralite is also equipped with Savage’s AccuTrigger, which allows for adjustable pull weight from 1.5 to 4 lbs.

Finally, Savage opted to upgrade the Ultralite with a factory blue-printed action which is intended to improve performance and consistency thanks to extra tight tolerances in the action and in the mating of the action to the barrel. 

What makes the 110 Ultralite stand out is its Proof Research carbon fiber-wrapped barrel. This barrel system shaves a lot of weight from the system, and those familiar with Proof know that these barrels are excellent in terms of accuracy. Additional ounces are saved thanks to lightening cuts in the action itself, and spiral fluting on the body of the bolt. All in, the Ultralite weighs in at less than 6 lbs., making it handy, portable and ideal for hunts in big country.

Controls are where you would expect, with the two-position tang-mounted safety, the bolt release forward of the trigger guard, and the magazine release is integral to the detachable box magazine that, for the 6.5 Creedmoor, has a four-round capacity.

The Ultralite does not come with any sights, but the receiver is drilled and tapped to accept an optic.

In testing, besides its very light weight, what stood out to me was the incredible accuracy of this rifle. Even during sight-in with American Eagle ammunition, when supported by a solid rest, this rifle was easily printing 3/4 m.o.a. groups, and from a field rest like shooting sticks or a bipod, it is still stacking rounds at 100 yds. in groups smaller than 1”.

So for those called to high places in pursuit of game, an those who measure their treks in hours and miles, the Savage Ultralite may be the ideal companion for your next foray into the field.

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