Montana Rifle Company Model 1999

by
posted on March 21, 2011
2011321132535-mrifle_f.jpg

The millions of American riflemen smitten with the Mauser 98/Winchester M70-platform bolt-action have a new suitor in Montana Rifle Company (MRC). The family-owned and operated company out of Kalispell, Montana, initially earned its spurs supplying barreled actions for the custom-gunsmithing trade and then progressed to making its own custom rifles. MRC’s Model 1999 action closely resembles the M70’s footprint and controls, but relies on the Mauser’s cone-breech C-ring design for greater strength, and features five-point gas venting system that gives shooters superior protection from case failure. MRC now offers numerous model variations in both fine walnut and synthetic stocks, as well as different action and barrel lengths. The really exciting news is that MRC is getting close to introducing a production model that will be very close in quality and features to its custom rifles, but at a much lower price, reportedly in the $1,000 range.

Last week I joined MRC’s Jeff Sipe for a Texas nilgai hunt and enjoyed my first opportunity to shoot one of his rifles (the company was actually founded by Jeff’s dad). Using a long-range model chambered in .338 Lapua Mag., we both did something pretty unusual—drop a nilgai bull in its tracks—one shot and down for the count. These 600-700-lb. antelope, successfully introduced to the south Texas brush country several decades back and widespread now, have a big reputation for toughness. For years, hunting writers have reported just how difficult to drop a nilgai cleanly, almost equating them to Cape buffalo-level toughness. So call it the exception to the rule, dumb luck or whatever, when we came equipped with a really accurate rifle in a really hard-hitting caliber and put our shots where it really counted—BAM! Check it out below.

 

Latest

Eotech Launches Anti
Eotech Launches Anti

EOTech Launches Anti-Counterfeit Measures

EOTech has launched a campaign targeting those who create and sell illegal copies of its military sighting systems.

The .405 Winchester: History and Performance

Now largely a forgotten footnote in cartridge development, the .405 Winchester was once the most powerful rimmed cartridge capable of use in a lever-action rifle and was a favorite of Theodore Roosevelt.

Colt Mustang .380 ACP: The Pocket-Size 1911

Based off the classic 1911 design, the small Colt Mustang chambered in .380 ACP is easily concealable and shares the same classic look in its tiny frame.

NRA Reschedules The Annual Members' Meeting

The NRA has rescheduled its Annual Members' Meeting to occur on Oct. 2, 2021 in Charlotte, NC.

The Men And Guns Of D-Day: 101st Airborne Division

Watch this segment of American Rifleman Television "The Men And Guns Of D-Day" to learn more about the men of the 101st Airborne Division, their stories and the firearms they used during "The Great Crusade."

Pat Garrett's Pistol Sells for Highest Price in History

The Colt Single Action Army revolver used by Pat Garrett to kill Billy The Kid sold at auction from Bonhams for more than $6 million dollars, in what is probably the highest price ever paid for a civilian firearm.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.