NRA Gun Gear of the Week: Colt Wiley Clapp Lightweight Commander 9 mm Pistol

posted on August 18, 2019

Though the concept was originally introduced in the 1950s, the Colt Lightweight Commander in 9 mm Luger didn’t take off the way a modern shooter might expect. The carry and concealment qualities of the Commander-size platform—full-size grip and magazine, but shortened slide and 4.25” barrel—were appreciated, but the metallurgy for the lightweight aluminum-alloy frame, and particularly the quality and performance of 1950s-era 9 mm Luger ammunition were not, shall we say, confidence inspiring. Of course, in terms of manufacturing and ballistics, we’ve come a long way in the last 60-plus years. The Colt Wiley Clapp Lightweight Commander in 9 mm Luger was designed in part by its namesake long-time American Rifleman Field Editor, and has the appearance and some features of a classic Colt autoloader—including a brass bead front sight and G.I.-style tab safety lever. Rest assured, though, the gun also takes advantage of modern technology and ammunition to yield a firearm that is very suitable for today’s armed citizen. To learn more, watch our NRA Gun Gear of the Week video hosted by American Rifleman's Joe Kurtenbach.

Additional Reading:
Colt's New M1911s: The Competition Pistol and Lightweight Commander  












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