NRA Gun of the Week: Short, Magazine Lee-Enfield Mk III

by
posted on December 3, 2016

A century ago, as the “War to End All Wars” was fought in the horrific trenches of France and Flanders, one rifle more than proved its worth on the Western Front. The Short, Magazine Lee-Enfield was the workhouse of the British Empire from the 1890s until the adoption of the FN FAL in the 1950s. The main British infantry rifle of the Great War was the SMLE Mk III chambered in .303 British, and it is our “NRA Gun of the Week.” The “smelly” as it was nicknamed has a short 25.2” barrel and detachable box magazine that held 10 rounds. The guns before 1916 had a magazine cut-off—allowing single rounds to be fed while holding 10 rounds in reserve for an emergency—as well as long-range volley sights. The SMLE today remains one of the slickest bolt-action rifles ever invented. Learn more in this week’s "NRA Gun of the Week" video hosted by American Rifleman's Mark Keefe.

Specifications:
Manufacturer: Birmingham Small Arms Company Limited (B.S.A.)
Model: Short, Magazine Lee-Enfield Mk III
Chambering: .303 British
Action Type: bolt-action, repeating center-fire rifle
Magazine: detachable box, 10-round capacity
Barrel Length: 25.2”
Overall Length: 44.5”
Weight: 8 lbs., 10 ozs.
Year of Manufacture: 1913

Additional Reading:

Lee-Enfield Rifle—Workhorse Of The British Empire
The Lee-Enfield: The Greatest Bolt-Action of the Great War
Top 10 Infantry Rifles

 

Latest

Front Sight Training
Front Sight Training

PrairieFire Emerges Following Front Sight Chapter 11 Filing

PrairieFire announced this week that the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Nevada confirmed the Chapter 11 plan of reorganization under which it will acquire 100 percent of Front Sight Management’s equity.

5 Common Grip & Stance Mistakes

Even for those who are seasoned and train regularly, sometimes mistakes can persist when it comes to shooting techniques. Here are five of the most common grip and stance mistakes made by shooters.

Windham Weaponry: Makers Of ARs & More

For Richard Dyke, previous owner of Bushmaster, his legacy has evolved under a new banner, Windham Weaponry, which continues to manufacture a number of AR-type rifles and pistols to this day.

The Winchester Model 70 Story

Developed off the design of the M1917 after World War I and unveiled in 1936, Winchester's Model 70 has become so iconic that it has earned the nickname of "the rifleman's rifle."

Henry Donates More Than $300K To Veterans Organizations

Henry Repeating Arms continues to contribute cash donations to veterans organizations, with more than $325,000 in donations this year alone.

The Rifleman Report: ​Industry Advancements

Whether in guns themselves or the cartridges they chamber or in optics or other firearm accessories, mechanical and material science innovations are key.

Interests



Get the best of American Rifleman delivered to your inbox.