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I Have This Old Gun: U.S. Model 1855 Rifle-Musket

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2020 to learn about the U.S. Model 1855 rifle-musket.

Rifleman Q&A: Needham Conversion

Is my gun an Allin conversion or does it have a different name?

This Old Gun: U.S. Model Of 1842 Musket

By the latter part of the 1830s, most of the major powers finally let practicality overcome economy, realizing that it was time to switch their small arms over from flintlock to percussion. Britain and France were among the earliest, with the United States following suit in short order—the Americans fielding the handsome Model of 1842.

Cavalry Arms Of The American Revolution

When well-trained and equipped, a determined light horseman of the American Revolution was a fearsome combined-arms foe.

Rifleman Q&A: Austrian Arms At Gettysburg

I need to identify this rifle. It is approximately a .71-cal. smoothbore musket fitted with a sling attachment on the trigger guard, but no forward sling attachment.

I Have this Old Gun: Martini-Henry Rifles

Watch this American Rifleman Television segment of "I Have This Old Gun" from 2019 to learn more about the history of the Martini-Henry breech-loading rifles, which were the mainstay of the British infantryman near the end of the 19th century.

​America’s First Sniper Rifle: The Telescopic-Sighted Krag-Jorgensen

The American Civil War was the first conflict in our nation’s history in which telescopic-sighted rifles were employed in combat to any appreciable extent. These muzzleloading, percussion rifles were fabricated by a number of civilian gunsmiths and gunsmithing firms, primarily for benchrest shooting matches.

Rifleman Q&A: Sporterized Springfield Musket?

Q: This firearm came from a vendor that said it was picked up off of a battlefield in North Carolina. The wooden stock and the metal look very old. A small “US” is stamped on top of the buttplate.

ARTV Preview: Eye Dominance, Walther PDP and the French 'Tabatiere'

Our newest episode of American Rifleman TV brings us back to the basics of shooting. We'll also take a look at the new Walther PDP and look back at the old French "Tabatiere" breechloader.

This Old Gun: Pattern 1853 Enfield

Simply put, the Pattern 1853 Enfield rifle-musket, along with its variants, is one of the most important firearms of the 19th century.

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