The US M3/M3A1 Submachine Gun:  The Complete History Of America’s Famed “Grease Gun”

Book Review: The US M3/M3A1 Submachine Gun

Michael Heidler, no stranger to writing about firearm history, has produced a most impressive volume on one of this author’s favorite World War II firearms, the M3 “grease gun.”

Rifleman Q&A: Correct WWII M1 Bayonets

From the American Rifleman archives, NRA member writes Dope Bag noting trouble with sourcing a proper-length bayonet to display with a personal World War II M1 Garand rifle.

Volkssturmgewehr: The German VG1-5 'People's Storm Rifle'

While many are familiar with more widely known examples of late World War II German small arms like the MP44 and Gewehr 43, few know of the simplistic "People's Storm Rifle" designed and built specifically for use by the conscripted Volkssturm, the VG1-5 Volkssturmgewehr.

Favorite Firearms: A French Shotgun Brought Home

For one NRA member in Virginia, a French-made shotgun, the Robust No. 32 is a treasured firearm that was a acquired in Germany during World War II.

70 Years Of Service: The 1870/87/15 Vetterli-Vitali

While there are many military rifles that have seen extensive service, the Italian M1870/87/15 Vetterli-Vitali stands out as one of the longest-serving military rifles in any guise.

ARTV: The Men and Guns of D-Day

Watch this segment of American Rifleman Television to learn more about the men of D-Day and the firearms they used during "The Great Crusade."

The U.S.S. LST 393: World War II U.S. Navy Tank Landing Ship

Now in Muskegon, Mich. as a museum ship, U.S.S. LST 393 once served as a specialized landing ship for the United States Navy, delivering thousands of troops and vehicles from the coast of Sicily to the shores of Normandy during D-day.

The Remington Model 11 Sportsman In World War II

Just like millions of American sportsmen, Remington’s “The Sportsman” pulled its weight as a trainer and guard gun during World War II.

The International Harvester M1 Garand: A New Rifle for the Nuclear Age

Of the four manufactures contracted by the U.S. Government to produce the M1 rifle, International Harvester was the least obvious of the choices.

Rifleman Q&A: Why Didn't The U.S. Army Issue .45 Auto Rim?

Q: If the .45 Auto Rim cartridge doesn’t require the use of a cumbersome half-moon clip in order to be ejected from the Model 1917 Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers, why wasn’t it issued to our troops armed with M1917 revolvers during World War II?

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