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The Krag-Jorgensen: America's First Bolt-Action Service Rifle

The U.S. Krag-Jorgensen was America’s first bolt-action repeater chambered for a smokeless-powder cartridge. In the hands of American troops around the globe, the Krag played a small, but key, role in the rise of the “American Century.”

The 7x57 mm Mauser: History & Performance

Developed in the early 1890s, the 7x57 mm Mauser was the high-speed, low-drag cartridge of its day, and it still holds its own more than a century after its adoption.

Origins of the 'Trapdoor' Springfield: The Allin Conversions

Though little known today, the “Allin Conversions” and the other early “Trapdoor Springfields” represent an important part of the evolution of U.S. military small arms.

The Model 1895 Lee Navy: Background & Value

Considering the trends in U.S. military firearm technology during the 1890s, the country’s selection of a proprietary straight-pull rifle like the Model 1895 Lee Navy is extraordinary.

The Cavalry’s Last Charge: The 1921 M1903 Prototype Carbine

Even though the last cavalry carbine of the U.S. Army was the M1899 Krag-Jorgensen, the U.S. Cavalry didn’t give up on fielding its own gun until the early 1920s.

Guns of the Spanish-American War 1898

Lucky were the soldiers armed with the .30–40 Krag-Jorgensen, but many Americans fought with the antiquated Trapdoor Springfield. The Spanish-American war was a conflict in which the U.S. Army first used machine guns and double-action Colts.

Video: I Have This Old Gun—Roosevelt’s Saber

Watch another segment of American Rifleman TV's "I Have This Old Gun."

I Have This Old Gun: Model 1895 Lee Navy

Considering the trends in U.S. military firearm technology during the 1890s, the country’s selection of a proprietary straight-pull rifle is extraordinary.

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