support_lead_sitting-sling-2.jpg

Back to Basics: Shooting Support

Today we have dozens of aftermarket devices designed purportedly to help a shooter hold his or her gun steadily.

Throwback Thursday: The Quick Draw from Sling Carry

Here is a lesson still relevant today from the “connoisseur of close combat” Lt. Col. Rex Applegate on how to get a rifle or carbine into action quickly from our April 1945 issue. When not going on commando raids or writing for Rifleman during the war, Lt. Col. Applegate was instructing Office of Strategic Services agents in close combat and gunfighting.

The Sling Is The Thing

The choice of sling is critical to a rifleman. My own rule of thumb is to use 1” slings on rifles weighing around 7 lbs. or less and 1¼” slings on those that are heavier.

World War II Garand Slings?

Can't find a WWII-vintage sling for your Garand? Consider this.

BLACKHAWK! Kudu Stretch Sling

The Kudu sling is made of nylon webbing with rubber ribs to make carrying a rifle more comfortable.

Andy’s Leather Rhodesian Scout Rifle Sling

The Rhodesian Scout Rifle Sling by Andy’s Leather is made of bridle leather and designed to aid in transport and operation of a long gun.

Butler Creek Gel Sling

The Butler Creek Gel Sling is made of a gel material to provide a lightweight cushion for comfort and stability.

Vero Vellini Premium Leather Rifle Slings

Vero Vellini’s Premium Leather collection features three variations of slings, all with high-grade leather and neoprene bottoms.

The Wilderness Giles Tactical Sling

The U.S.-made Wilderness Giles Tactical Sling is built of extra-dense nylon and designed to fit a variety of rifles.

The Parable Of The Sling

Dave was waiting for me at The Citadel Gun & Safe shop in Las Vegas where I’d called to see if they had a Picatinny rail fore-end for a mid-length Bravo Company AR. Dave checked his inventory and allowed that, yes, by golly, he does have a Yankee Hill fore-end in stock.

Interests



Subscribe to the NRA American Rifleman newsletter